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EDDIEKIRK

Cloning By eddiekirk

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Definitely. Cold cuttings may never root. If the temperature at clone root level is under 65 degrees, you'll want to use a heating mat. Temps of around 75 to 80 are optimal

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As easy as cloning is to the masses that use powder, liquid/gel rooting hormone, bubblers and soil, etc. There is an even less complex method of cloning that is so easy, it must have been around for decades, if not centuries. The only ingredients involved are water, light, and the cutting you would like to root. In the example I?m going to show, I?ve cut three different sizes of clone. The first with two leaves and a single growing tip (S). The next has four nodes, but still only a couple large leaves (M). The third is 6? tall, has seven nodes and several sets of good-sized leaves (L).

 

As with normal cloning, you immediately dip the cutting in the water for about 15 to 30 seconds, tweaking it to dislodge any air bubbles that may be present. But the biggest difference is, you won?t be removing the cutting from the water until it has roots big enough to support the foliage above. Make sure the cup, which contains the cutting, is opaque. This prevents the light from shining directly on the roots.

 

So far, I?ve mentioned the cuttings and the water, but the most important part is the light. I have made this method work 100% of the time simply by sitting my cuttings on a windowsill that receives no direct sunlight. In fact, slightly shaded would be even better. In the evenings (short days), I sit them on an end table over 7 feet from a ceiling mounted 100-watt incandescent bulb. At bedtime, I just turn off the lights like normal, and when I get up in the AM its back to the windowsill. During the longer daylight hours they can be left on the sill full time. Remember, no direct sunlight.

 

The picture shows my three cuttings in their water cups. M & L have barely an inch of water to sit in. Any more and it would cover one of the leaf stems. The smaller one stayed in the plastic because the stem was too short to sit in water and stay upright in the cup. Do what?s necessary to keep at least ½? of the stem in the water.

 

Notice the glass that diffuses light, an extra measure against too much light exposure.

 

 

cloning1.jpg

The clones grew roots at far different speeds. S showed in seven days, with a small ¼? long root and another small protrusion.

cloning2.jpg

By the time S?s roots reached this level of development (nine days), L was just putting out the first nubs that would be roots. M has shown no inclination of rooting at all. Searching for an answer, I changed the water in Ms cup, but I think it boils down too the thickness of the stem. Both M&L have the same size stem but L has far more foliage on top.

 

 

cloning3.jpg

S is doing far better than the others (seen below) and M is finally starting to show.

 

 

cloning5.jpg

M showed roots in 14 days and was planted on day 18.

This picture was taken just before transplant.

 

 

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L showed roots on day 11 and was in soil at day 18.

This picture was taken just before transplant.

 

 

cloning4.jpg

S showed roots at seven days and was in the soil at 15.

This picture was taken just before transplant.

 

 

cloning7.jpg

Transplanting is as easy as it ever is. I use a pre-fertilized potting soil, mixed with 1/2 perlite. I like the clear cups as I can see how soon they can be removed from the humidity dome. Fill a 4 oz cup with soil mix and swirl a hole an inch deep in the top, insert the plants roots and cover.

 

DO NOT WATER!! Watering will actually delay the roots growth into the new medium. You want it almost dry below so they search for the moisture. Make whatever mix you use semi-moist before transplant.

 

 

cloning8.jpg

The dome you see is a cheapo Styrofoam cooler available from any grocery store for $2-$3. Toss the lid and cover with saran wrap with a 1/2 dozen 1/4" holes in it. What you see in the picture is a spare piece of plexi I have. It sits off centre to provide some venting. Simply set an open jar of water inside and close. The jar itself will keep the humidity at around 75%. If you don?t like this, just spray a couple times a day with plain water.

 

 

cloning6.jpg

L showed itself almost overnight.

 

 

cloningA.jpg

All were in the 320-watt veg area in roughly three weeks from cutting to final transplant.

 

 

 

 

That?s it, the easiest cloning method there is. No spraying, no overheating, no drying out, no hormones, just plant, light and water. Following these instructions, I?ve had a 100% success rate (The one that died actually drank all her water and I forgot to refill!). Good luck!

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After about a week you can test to see if your plants have started to root. Remove the humidity dome and leave it off for between twenty minutes and two hours. Watch the clones for any signs of wilting while the dome is removed. If the plants have not wilted at all then they probably have enough root development to support themselves. If no wilt is noticed leave the dome off, if they are wilted, spray the cuttings and dome and replace the dome on the tray.

 

Once you have determined that the plants can support themselves, stop misting the cuttings and leave the humidity dome off. (NOTE: Once the plants have roots, constant misting can actually be harmful to the plants).

 

If the lower leaves start to turn yellow and die, don't worry, it is perfectly normal. It is the plant feeding off of itself to sustain life, moving valuable nutrient and water from the older growth. Do not remove any dead growth until the plant is well rooted. If you remove the dying growth the plant can starve and die completely.

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An internode is the place on the stem where the leaf (plus its stem)

intersect the main stem.

 

When taking a cutting you must cut it long enough to have at least one

trimmed internode under the medium. Try to take a cutting that is at least 3 inches long. I visualize where to cut first.

 

I'll cut the branch about a half inch below the node I plan on

being below the surface of the medium (more than one node can be under

the medium surface).

 

Once the cut has been made, I trim off all leaves and branches except the top two fan leaves and the growing tip of the branch. This will leave a nice stem for planting.

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It really depends on the ambient humidity in the grow room / closet. Is it cold and dry or decently warm and humid? If its dry (under 40% humidity), I'd say you want a dome.

 

A good hint for taking firm cuttings is really drench the mother with light-bloom water a few hours before taking the cuttings.

 

Having said that, I don't use any humidity domes. I mist a few times a day for the first few days then once a day until about 8 days when they start to root.

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Some varieties are easier to clone than others. There are Sativas that will sprout roots so easy, you can (almost) stick them in the ground and forget em. But then there are some early Indicas that you can baby and they will just sit there and starve to death. So there are a few things you have got to look at.

 

Help the roots grow. Figure out where the roots will grow on your cutting before you actually cut it. Keep this portion of the stem dark for a week or two by wrapping some tape around it. This is called "etiolation" and will encourage rooting. Make the cutting with a sharp anvil pruner or very sharp scissors, and sterilize them after each cut. A dull pruner will crush the stem and it will be harder for the roots to form. A razor blade will make an even cleaner cut, which will also help rooting, but don't blame me if you cut yourself. Try to make the cut at angle to increase the surface area it has to absorb water.

 

The plant needs air to help the roots form, but don't let any get in the stem. This will cut off the capillary action and make the poor cutting work harder. Immediately dunk the cut end in water or rooting solution to prevent this from happening. You could even take it over to the sink and make a second cut under running water if you're really worried about it. Leave it in the rooting solution for a day or so. If you just leave it in the water, you might get lucky and sprout some roots, but they really need some oxygen. You can actively provide O2 by aeration or passively aerate by using an airy medium.

 

Another thing that makes the cutting work harder is breathing itself. Use a plastic dome or humidity tent to limit transpiration and keep the medium from drying out, and. Half of a 16 oz plastic drink bottle fits right on top of a 3 inch clay pot. Another way to limit transpiration is to cut about half off of each leaflet. You will still have the same number of leaves on the stem, but the surface area has decreased. This also helps control fungus by preventing the leaves from contacting the dome or the medium.

 

The proper lighting is also important. Direct sunlight will heat the air in the dome too much, but they're not going to root in the dark either. Fluorescents are ideal for this. An HID is OK if it’s not too close, or you could even give them a bit of indirect sun from a window if you can keep them warm.

 

You’ve kept an eye on the pH and the nutes, and you see it’s starting to grow again, so its safe to assume that it has roots and you can remove the humidity dome. Occasionally a cutting may wilt a little at first, but give it a mist and it should perk up. If none of these tips help, either consider tissue culture or finding a different mother

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well sometimes the clon was taken when the plant was just started to bud.

some work great and veg right off others tho have gone too far into bud so they have to revert into veg and that takes 30 days

 

some need incourage to grow so ya nip back the bottom branches of the plant. some are well just stunted and won't grow.

 

just what I seen happen hope this helps!


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heat their feet.

 

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THE CODE OF HUMANITY:I CHOOSE TO COMMUNICATE TRUTH,I CHOOSE THE REALITY OF LIFE,I CHOOSE TO HEAL NOT HURT,I CHOOSE EDUCATION OVER IGNORANCE,I CHOOSE THE POWER OF PEACE,I CHOOSE TO LOVE GOD(OR GOOD)AND SEE GOD OR GOOD IN ALL HUMANITY,I CHOOSE TO SEEK THE SOUL IN ALL LIVING THINGS,I CHOOSE TO LINK TO THE WORLD OF INSPIRATION,I CHOOSE THE PRINCIPLE OF SHARING,I CHOOSE TO BECOME A CO-CREATOR IN LIFE AND LIVE IT MORE ABUNDANTLY.

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Guest Dr.DandLL

I would like to add my two cents worth if I may.

 

The shade/lower light level does have a positive effect on root development. I find that lower light combined with higher temps at root zone with lower air temps at the leaf level really makes the roots take off. Think around a 15 to 20 degree shift if possible. this is where a bubbler type of cloner can shine provided you can heat the solution that is being sprayed to that 80-85 degree level with air temps at the 67-72 degree mark. The lower light levels should be discontinued as soon as the the root NODES are developing. Ideally it should be it the 3-5 day mark. At that point I go to a fluorescent shop lamp right on the tops- 1-2" above- with a white plastic sheet as a homemade dome. Holds 2 trays nicely.

 

A major factor that no one seems to mention is water quality/tds. you can improve clone size/time to soil significantly by using distilled or reverse osmosis water (ro). This will have 2 advantages over tap water. One will be no bacteria or other waterborne micro activities like that nasty green slime. The biggest may be the lack of any TDS or other heavy metals that can cause nutrient lock ups. This is of major note to you hydro growers as well!!!

 

I also note that no mention was made of a very simple technique to improve rooting sites. Take that razor blade (those disposable scapels work awesome!) that you are using to make cuttings, and make a light scrape- the idea is to just rough up the cell surface- down the stem of the cutting 1/2" above the cut on each side. This light trauma will cause those cells to change over from stem cells to root nodes. Again cuts down on time the plants "stalls out" while rooting.

 

Under the ideal conditions, the cutting should continue to actually grow at the same rate that the mother plant shoots that it came from. Most the time you can cut stall time down to just a couple of days versus a week or more that some growers see. Every mis-handling or stress event the cutting is subject to the more days one can expect the plant to stall out in a no growth condition.

 

Please keep in mind the times I use can only be achieved under IDEAL conditions. Add days to weeks under harsher environments. Holler if you have any specific questions or input. G'day from Dr.D and LL

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I would like to add my two cents worth if I may.

 

The shade/lower light level does have a positive effect on root development. I find that lower light combined with higher temps at root zone with lower air temps at the leaf level really makes the roots take off. Think around a 15 to 20 degree shift if possible. this is where a bubbler type of cloner can shine provided you can heat the solution that is being sprayed to that 80-85 degree level with air temps at the 67-72 degree mark. The lower light levels should be discontinued as soon as the the root NODES are developing. Ideally it should be it the 3-5 day mark. At that point I go to a fluorescent shop lamp right on the tops- 1-2" above- with a white plastic sheet as a homemade dome. Holds 2 trays nicely.

 

A major factor that no one seems to mention is water quality/tds. you can improve clone size/time to soil significantly by using distilled or reverse osmosis water (ro). This will have 2 advantages over tap water. One will be no bacteria or other waterborne micro activities like that nasty green slime. The biggest may be the lack of any TDS or other heavy metals that can cause nutrient lock ups. This is of major note to you hydro growers as well!!!

 

I also note that no mention was made of a very simple technique to improve rooting sites. Take that razor blade (those disposable scapels work awesome!) that you are using to make cuttings, and make a light scrape- the idea is to just rough up the cell surface- down the stem of the cutting 1/2" above the cut on each side. This light trauma will cause those cells to change over from stem cells to root nodes. Again cuts down on time the plants "stalls out" while rooting.

 

Under the ideal conditions, the cutting should continue to actually grow at the same rate that the mother plant shoots that it came from. Most the time you can cut stall time down to just a couple of days versus a week or more that some growers see. Every mis-handling or stress event the cutting is subject to the more days one can expect the plant to stall out in a no growth condition.

 

Please keep in mind the times I use can only be achieved under IDEAL conditions. Add days to weeks under harsher environments. Holler if you have any specific questions or input. G'day from Dr.D and LL

good info, most of it I have read from a book

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