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Spider mites be gone!

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I must live in spider mites city, because I was always getting spider mites. It seemed as though I'd just get rid of them only to have them come right back. Sound familiar? If so you may want to consider this little tip that I was turned onto. I was simply told to: get a bag of red Cedar open it and place it in my grow room. Well my grow room measures in at 10 x 10 too small to have a bag in my way. So I opened it and proceeded to spread it around the base of each plant, on the floor. At about 2 inches deep. My end result was, Cedar beds surrounding the plants and large walking paths in my room. It looks great! More like a garden I think? Ha ha! Anyway: on top of this I stopped bringing in outside plants, without first having had to properly treat and segregate the new plant from the garden. So far on this little experimental tip, I personally have not seen a spider mite in my garden since I started. So far it's been weeks, maybe two months or better with no spider mites. Oh and did I forget to mention: I have not been treating my garden preventively or otherwise. My personal experience on this has been great so far! I sincerely hope you find this method as successful as I have.(Results may vary) ha ha! Yours truly DB.

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very cool. wonder if a cedar mulch on the tops of the pots would dual purpose, helping with fungal presence, and allowing the scent of the cedar to chase off the bugs. Good find, DB!

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very cool. wonder if a cedar mulch on the tops of the pots would dual purpose, helping with fungal presence, and allowing the scent of the cedar to chase off the bugs. Good find, DB!

I think Cedar mulch would contain acid. So I think it may affect your soil pH. Although of this I'm not certain. It may be advisable to do some research on it before putting anything on your soil. Yours truly DB.

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the ph isn't the problem: by allowing the soil to maintain a fungal presence, the ph stays acidic, and then you add, incrementally, bacteria to keep it from being too acidic. if the PH is down to 4, bacteria cannot form their bio slime. ph above 7, and the fungus cannot grow as well.

I would be more worried about any resins or other toxins that might leach out.

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Ph tends to climb anyhow.

A small amount of acidic presence on the top probably wouldn't hurt. Just watch the ph of runoff water. I surely wouldn't recommend going overboard with too much of it though.

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...And I wouldn't reccomend "cedar mulch". Too many unknowns.

 

If *I* was to do such a thing (which I am not), I'd use cedar rodent bedding. Available at any pet store.

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Cedar pet bedding you say. I don't see why it wouldn't work as well. But I wonder which is cheaper? For myself I have to go way that saves me the money. There may be an advantage to pet bedding though, because the fact is if you use red Cedar mulch on your floor you have to let it dry out it takes a few days. Once it is dry the downside to this is that if you're a smoker or medicate in your grow room, the Cedar mulch beds become a fire hazard. Just thought you all should be aware of this before you consider using this method. I know from experience because I just about set my Cedar bed on fire. I got lucky, needless to say I don't smoke or medicate my garden any longer. Not to scare anyone off from a great method or anything just the facts oh and there is one other thing, it may be wiser to dry it out before placing any on the floor. As the moisture may cause damage to the floor. Just a couple of things to consider. Whatever your choice may be may your garden always be healthy. Yours truly DB.

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I would be worried about the cedar MULCH being contaminated before purchase. It's not made for what we do, and, in my opinion, would be likely to have bugs in the bag. The cedar pet bedding is clean.

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I have been battling super mites for months. Like you, I would think they were gone, and they would be back, and my harvests have suffered. I refused to offer clones cause I wouldn't wish them on anyone. Right now, I think they are gone...fingers crossed. This is an interesting idea, and makes sense as they use cedar in dog beds for fleas. Sounds awfully messy though. Doesn't it blow around with your fans? I encourage you to stay vigilant, and watch for them!

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i have recent switched to floramite temporarly as we became immune to avid...and neems..supers but its working but do not use thid bloom ever..residuals will still be there if you do...flush well..imo,cheri

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i have recent switched to floramite temporarly as we became immune to avid...and neems..supers but its working but do not use thid bloom ever..residuals will still be there if you do...flush well..imo,cheri

 

I was switching back and forth between avid and floramite hoping to avoid a resistance, but they were

still dancing. I have a long list of things I have tried, mostly lately Organicide, and that seemed to kill

the eggs, and was the cheapest.

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azatrol/azamax.... stuff works wonders, but it start to get expensive, especially if you have to use it as a root drench.

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I agree about using the bedding cedar. It is a LOT easier to deal with and you won't end up with a bunch of splinters trying to spread it around. I would assume that it is also cleaner, because its intended use if for animals. Feed and tack stores tend to have reasonable prices on animal bedding, compared to PetSmart (which runs $5-15 per bag depending on size).

 

Would cedar planks works?

 

 

As for mites, we have used dry ice in the past, which worked well in a small area. The plants loved the Co2 burst they got. Its not the route I would suggest, but its always good to have alternative when nothing else seems to work.

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I agree about using the bedding cedar. It is a LOT easier to deal with and you won't end up with a bunch of splinters trying to spread it around. I would assume that it is also cleaner, because its intended use if for animals. Feed and tack stores tend to have reasonable prices on animal bedding, compared to PetSmart (which runs $5-15 per bag depending on size).

 

Would cedar planks works? I think cedar planks on the floor under the pots would be a better idea than the cedar mulch, as I have learned that steer mulch is extremely Flammable, so smokers beware

 

 

As for mites, we have used dry ice in the past, which worked well in a small area. The plants loved the Co2 burst they got. Its not the route I would suggest, but its always good to have alternative when nothing else seems to work.

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Another thing that mites like is Hibiscus.

I bought a couple for my wife since she teaches Hula & was asking a wise man I know if they would be okay to put in my indoor garden for the winter - his response was ABSOLUTELY! all mites will go straight for them!

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Updated information on spider mites be gone. I was talking to my mentor and according to her the cedar mulch bedding needs to be replaced about every four months yours truly DB. And

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it has been a couple months now, and my veg room is amazingly clean. way better then anything i have done in the past. with this information in hand, i am moving the chips into the bloom room in the next few days. i have high hopes to resolve or at least minimize mite issues.

 

dudz, good point on the clean product thoughts, but too late for me. sure looks clean. all gardeners hate pests. those products cannot introduce pests into landscapes or they would be sued. these are the products that i bought for professional landscaping jobs, so perhaps i had more confidence or vulnerability. was lucky this time.

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There have been a lot of good replies on this subject, I've given thought to many of them, such as the idea of using cedar pet bedding instead of red cedar mulch. I have not tried pet bedding so I cannot say it may be worth a try, cedar planking seems to be an option as well again I have not tried this and it seems to be cost prohibitive for me. Oh and the idea of washing the red cedar mulch before putting it into the garden does not seem like a very good idea to me. My mentor mentioned nothing of washing it. My thinking on it is that if you choose to wash it you may be washing out the things in the mulch that makes it work. Your guess is as good as mine. Oh and I wouldn't worry so much about the cedar mulch coming with bugs due to the fact that the entire idea behind it is to drive bugs away. I will admit to seeing some predator bugs though such as a spider and a centipede. However they died as a result of a lack of bugs. Just curious to know how many of you are considering trying this simple method? I personally cannot see gardening without it at this point in time. What ever method you choose I wish you all happy gardening. Yours truly DB.

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As a related thought, I am curious if a 'sachet' in front of air intake containing aromatic cedar, and dried lavender would have any effect ? Perhaps even marigold flowers and chrysanthemum petals as well ? Would the little pests be put off by the odors and not want to hang out ?

Sounds like the mulch is helping out in an effective way for your purposes. It only makes sense that it works, and the organic method being used is perfectly eco-friendly ! Keep us informed with progress reports as possible. Thank you for sharing your results !

<KZ>

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As a related thought, I am curious if a 'sachet' in front of air intake containing aromatic cedar, and dried lavender would have any effect ? Perhaps even marigold flowers and chrysanthemum petals as well ? Would the little pests be put off by the odors and not want to hang out ?

Sounds like the mulch is helping out in an effective way for your purposes. It only makes sense that it works, and the organic method being used is perfectly eco-friendly ! Keep us informed with progress reports as possible. Thank you for sharing your results !

<KZ>

I would be very curious as to if your method would work or not. Are you willing to try your theory and report back to us as to your results. If it helps you I'll add that to my gardening in addition to what I'm doing yours truly DB.

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I do not currently have any spider mites. I applied a chemical insecticide (floramite) before transplanting my starts out of soil, into a pumice stone media that I use to grow in. I admire those using organic pest control and nutrients, while choosing to use chemicals for my own garden. I am interested in learning all that I can about good gardening practices. This information sharing helps everyone to learn about what works well.

Thank you for sharing !

<KZ>

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I do not currently have any spider mites. I applied a chemical insecticide (floramite) before transplanting my starts out of soil, into a pumice stone media that I use to grow in. I admire those using organic pest control and nutrients, while choosing to use chemicals for my own garden. I am interested in learning all that I can about good gardening practices. This information sharing helps everyone to learn about what works well.

Thank you for sharing !

<KZ>

chemicals did you say chemicals? Why on earth would you feel a need to use potentially dangerous chemicals? It's up to you of course, however I am curious. I have used chemicals in times past for emergencies so I am less than perfect in fact I'm not entirely certain that I am 100% organic now in fact now that I think about it the soil im using may contain chemical fertilizers at the time it was that soil or no soil. I will be glad to be ridden of it. Now that I can get fox farm for $10.00 a bag it will no longer be necessary for me too use trash soil, my personal goal has always been to achieve 100% organic and one day I will yours truly DB.

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