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Tentoes1962

Starting a new grow (indoor)

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Hi everyone!  I would like to say thank you to everyone who offered advice on my first grow here in Oregon.  I will still be limited to a 6’x5’ grow area, but that is cool with me.  That area is still occupied by one flowering female that I am about to chop.

 

So I have started with some plastic cups to put the seedlings into after sprouting.  I plan to use FFOF again (I have had such good luck with it) but I have some questions: 1) If I re-use soil from a previous grow, is there anything I should do to that soil, such as remediation or root removal?

2) Should I use mycorrhizae on the seedlings immediately after sprouting? Or should that wait awhile until better established?

3) Lighting will be 5000k CFLs again with a few blurple LEDs.

 

That’s all I can think of right now but I appreciate your comments and criticisms!

 

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My recommendation bro is ditch that fox farm if u haven't already got it yet and get some your soil from buildasoil.com best quality organic soil u can buy period!

 

As far as reusing soil this can definitely be done successfully however I do recommend a few things a good quality compost and worm castings at a 1:1 ratio with a sprinkling of kelp meal and crab meal, no need to remove the roots u can pull a plant out and plant directly back into it I would cut the old stem as long as u can before the top dress and it will cover it up the roots will still have exudates that will help your new starts 

 

I always agree with the use of myco fungi can I ask which one you use currently?? 

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29 minutes ago, popeye! said:

buildasoil.com best quality organic soil u can buy period!

 

That is really great soil and not a bad price. 

 

Nutrients included in the soil: 

Acadian Kelp Meal @ 1/2 Cup per cubic foot

Crustacean Meal @ 1/2 cup per cubic foot

Brix Blend Basalt @ 2 Cups Per Cubic Foot

Gypsum Dust @ 1 Cup Per Cubic Foot

Oyster Flour @ 1 Cup Per Cubic Foot

Terviva Karanja Cake @ 1/2 Cup Per Cubic Foot

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On 10/17/2020 at 7:28 AM, Tentoes1962 said:

Hi everyone!  I would like to say thank you to everyone who offered advice on my first grow here in Oregon.  I will still be limited to a 6’x5’ grow area, but that is cool with me.  That area is still occupied by one flowering female that I am about to chop.

 

So I have started with some plastic cups to put the seedlings into after sprouting.  I plan to use FFOF again (I have had such good luck with it) but I have some questions: 1) If I re-use soil from a previous grow, is there anything I should do to that soil, such as remediation or root removal?

2) Should I use mycorrhizae on the seedlings immediately after sprouting? Or should that wait awhile until better established?

3) Lighting will be 5000k CFLs again with a few blurple LEDs.

 

That’s all I can think of right now but I appreciate your comments and criticisms!

 

One should assume that all the organic nutrients from your spent soil are no mas; I assume that after 70 days after application, about 75% of Plant Available Nitrogen (PAN) has already been released.

 

I found this study quite helpful. https://extension.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/documents/1/sullivanetal2010worldcongresssoilscience.pdf

 

Some growing philosophies have certain dogmas that require the root ball to remain intact, others don't. I am in the camp of reclaiming soil and remove rootballs.

 

Regarding applications of Mycorrhiza, this root helping fungi should be placed as close to the root as possible. For cuttings I provide copious amounts (500 spores per gram--available in Myco Jordan by Elite) to the cutting grow medium and further root dustings at each transplant. For seedlings, adding a good amount to the seedling grow medium should be sufficient.

 

For rootings and cuttings, I mix my own grow medium equal parts of Peat and Vermiculite that is amended with CalPhos, Gypsum, Dolomite and Myco Jordan; I stay away from heavy charged grow medium. By mixing my own, I can guarantee my freshness and quality of inputs. The last pre-mixed bagged grow medium I bought must have been 30 years ago (before I started followed Biodynamics for my veggie garden--long before my cannabis growing days); I found the inconsistencies from bag to bag way too extreme. Do this yourself, test samples from different bags. Seldom did I find the results to be consistent; and not knowing how fresh the medium is (lack of production date)--was it made last month? Last month? Two years ago? And temperature during shipping--how many hours did the bag bake in the sun (exceeding 100 degrees)? Nahh, too many unknowns for this old perfectionist to be happy.

 

Seedling/Rooting mix:

1 gal Sphagnum Peat

1 gal Vermiculite

 

18 grams Myco Jordon

50 grams Dolomite
9 grams Calphos
9 grams Gypsum

 

Mix well then add 11 oz water

Let sit for 2-3 days (allowing the PH to adjust).

 

Lighting--I would be cautious of using high UVB lamps (5000k), sometimes the new leafs don't like the direct UVB intensity. I use 4000k or less--or make sure there is at least a 24" distance between lamps and plant.

 

Instead of tossing a dash of this, a pinch of that or worst yet--following "bro science", I would insure that your grow medium is charged for cannabis. The best numbers I have seen is from Smart Fertilizer

https://www.smart-fertilizer.com/articles/nutrient-management-cannabis/

 

image.png.68c2e17c981728bbf457d9d0bdc95603.png

350 ppm = 0.035% Nitrogen

 

For a grow medium that weighs 10 lbs (4,540 grams), you would add 1.589 grams of N. (4540 grams X 0.035% = 1.589 grams)...350 ppm N.

 

Since Blood Meal contains 14% Nitrogen, then you would add 11.35 grams of Blood Meal (1.589 grams ÷ 14% = 11.35 grams)

 

So the question is: How much nutrients do I add to achieve the desired ppm's?

 

Hope this helps.

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Thank you, Backdoor!!

 

Relating to your comment on 5000k CFLs, I used these exclusively in this most recent grow and I really like using them and am a big believer in their usefulness, particularly in veg.  I like them because:

1) During veg, I rarely have ANY leaves that need to be removed due to spots or yellowing and 

2) I feel I had a respectable harvest even when using them through flowering.  I even used a few (three out of about 24) CFLs that are rated at 6500k.

 

I appreciate your concern for using these because of the UVb emission, but I have heard (hopefully not bro-science) that blue light (particularly blue light at 430, 450 and 470 nm) promotes shorter, less elongated stems and an overall more compact plant.  

 

On a whim, I added a set of two, “5000k LED” lights placed at the bottom of the plant. (Okay so these are LEDs made by Feit, and are advertised as 100watt replacements, they are plain-ole Edison socket bulbs).  I have attached a picture of what the buds look like after about a month-long regimen of light from these bulbs.  I am sure that the light spectrum from these LEDs is not exactly the same as from the CFLs, but I will do this again the next time I grow, based on the size and appearance of the buds being illuminated by these LEDs. (See pic)D5627487-59E1-4555-BDDB-A47F0132D63F.jpeg.c207439220bdf5760af0cc40906b8853.jpeg

 

So the plant in the picture is one of a particular strain (Tree of Life BX).  I harvested three other females of a different strain (Pineapple Haze and 2nd Sight).  Without the added light, I don’t believe that these buds would have been as robust as they are.

 

Please don’t think that I am discounting your comments in the last post, I am still trying to get my head around all of the nutrient world. 

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