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Purple Power

The Pest: Spider Mites

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Spider Mites (family: Tetranychidae)

 

two-spotted-spider-mite-adult-with-egg-s

 

Special Species Notes: Adult females have the ability to go dormant for a time after the photoperiod (daily hours of light) shortens, then re-emerge to lay more eggs a few weeks after the photoperiod lengthens again. That's one reason Spider Mites keep reappearing crop after crop on indoor plants. They can be especially destructive in greenhouses.

 

Spider mites are wind surfers. They disperse over wide areas riding their webbing on the breezes, or be carried by pets, clothing or infected plant material. Careful containment and disposal of infested plants is crucial.

 

Quarantine; what is it and why do I need to?

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14249-quarantine-what-is-it-and-why-do-i-need-to/

 

Host plants are many and include strawberries, bean, melons, beans, tomatoes, eggplant, ornamental flowers, trees, most houseplants, and cannabis. Use, for example, a bean plants  as a 'host plant' for an attractant of spider mites and then throwing them out and reintroducing new trap plants continuously.

 

The names “spider mite” and “webspinning mite” come from the silk webbing most species produce on infested leaves . Spider mites are not true insects, but are classed as a type of arachnid, relatives of spiders, ticks and scorpions.

 

 Spider mites are most common in hot, dry, and dusty conditions, especially where their natural enemies have been killed off by insecticide use,  and commonly become numerous in June through September. Usually are first found on trees or plants adjacent to dusty roadways or at margins of gardens. Some of the many species common in North America are predators of the plant-feeding mites, which make up the vast majority.

 

spider-mite-web.jpg

IDENTIFICATION

To the naked eye, spider mites look like tiny, moving dots; however, you can see them easily with a 10X hand lens. To observe mites more closely, shake a few off the leaf surface onto a white sheet of paper. Once disturbed, they will move around rapidly. After, I fold up the paper and burn it. Adult females, the largest forms, are less than 1/20 inch long. Mites live in colonies, mostly on the underside of leaves, and feed by piercing leaf tissue and sucking up the plant fluids. A single colony may contain hundreds of individuals. The presence of webbing is an easy way to distinguish them.

 

two-spotted-spider-mites-with-eggs-sm.jp

 

Adults are reddish brown or pale in color, oval-shaped and very small (1/50 inch long) – about the size of the period at the end of this sentence. with two red eyespots near the head end. Females usually have a large, dark blotch on each side of the body and numerous bristles covering the legs and body. Immature stages resemble the adults except only smaller.

 

I-AC-TSPP-EG.005h.jpg

 

Two spotted spider mite eggs

 

Life Cycle: In some parts of California, spider mites may feed and reproduce all year on plants that retain their green leaves throughout the winter. In colder areas and on deciduous trees that drop their leaves, Most mite species overwinter as female or as eggs on the leaves, bark of host plants, and in ground litter and trash. They begin feeding and laying eggs when warm weather returns in spring.. In early spring, as temperatures warm, tiny six-legged larvae begin hatching and feed for a few days before seeking shelter where they molt into the first nymphal stage. Nymphs have eight-legs and pass through two more molts before becoming mature adults.

 

After mating, females continuously produce as many as 300 eggs over a couple of weeks. Hot, dry weather favors rapid development of these pests. During such conditions the time it takes to pass from egg to adult may occur in as little as 5 days. There are several overlapping generations per year.

 

As foliage quality declines on heavily infested plants, female mites catch wind currents and disperse to other plants. High mite populations may undergo a rapid decline in late summer when predators overtake them, host plant conditions become unfavorable, and the weather turns cooler as well as following rain.

 

I-AC-TSPP-CD.125h.jpg

 

Leaf Stippling

   First Sign: When spider mites are feeding marks little yellow speckles or stipplings show on leaf surfaces. When you turn a leaf over (underside of leaf), tiny, oval shaped mites, about pin head in size, are scurrying around. Their eggs, best seen with a magnifier, will be scattered around at random. Spider Mite eggs are all perfectly round, the same size, ranging from clear to amber in color. As feeding continues, the leaves turn yellow and may dry up and drop off. With larger infestations a fine webbing, crawling with mites, covers the plant tops (also known as tenting). The mites activity is visible in the tight webs that are formed under leaves and along stems.
 

spider-mite-damage-cannabis-sm.jpg

 

Leaf spotting

   Most Common Species: The Two Spot. The "two spot" Spider Mites are usually yellow/tan/greenish in color, and by maturity they grow two dark spots on their shoulders, one on each side. The larger the spots, the older the mite, or the more chlorophyll there is in the plant species they are feeding on. Spider Mites can float along with wind currents, or be carried by pets, clothing or infected plant material.
 

spider-mite-marijuana-webbing-leaf-sm.jp

 

Tenting


   Control : Mites are also known to develop quick resistance to various pesticides. This is why growers also call them the "Borg".  Chemical pesticide use actually encourages the spread of spider mites by killing the beneficial insects that prey on them. For these reasons, it’s important to control mites with effective natural and organic methods.

 

Don’t be hesitant to pull entire plants to prevent the mites spreading to its neighbors. Hence why I use 'Host plants"

 

Water stress makes both trees and garden plants more susceptible to mite infestations. Make sure your plants are properly watered. regular, forceful spraying of plants with water often will reduce spider mite numbers adequately. Be sure to get good coverage, especially on the undersides of leaves.

 

Wash your plants. Dust on leaves, branches and fruit encourages mites and will wash some off.

 

Using Insecticidal, soap, neem oil or botanicides can be used to spot treat heavily infested areas. When I was unfortunately introduced to spider mites years ago, I checked to see if these worked by using a microscope the hooks up to my pc. What did I see, the mites were swimming in it not affected.  Not surprising since the outdoor plants- trees, lawns, shrubs, all had mites. My neighbors have been probably using the same thing for years. This was years before avid and those kinds of pesticides hit our market. So what did I do, I started releasing beneficial insects outside ever spring, I've done this for years. Now I can have an outdoor garden and not have to worry as much about the borg. Canola, or cottonseed oils are acceptable.

 

There are also a number of plant extracts formulated as acaricides (a pesticide that kills mites) that exert an effect on spider mites. These include garlic extract, clove oil, mint oils, rosemary oil, cinnamon oil and others. Don’t use soaps or oils on water-stressed plants or when temperatures exceed 90°F. These materials may injure some plants, so check labels and/or test them out on a portion of the foliage several days before applying a full treatment. Oils and soaps must contact mites to kill them, so excellent coverage, especially on the undersides of leaves, is essential, and repeat applications may be required.

 

Sulfur sprays can be used on some vegetables, fruit trees, and ornamentals. This product will burn cucur­bits (squash, pumpkins, zucchini, gourds) and other plants in some cases. Don’t use sulfur unless it has been shown to be safe for that plant in your locality. Use liquid products such as sulfur and potash soap combinations (e.g., Safer Brand 3-in-1 Garden Spray) rather than sulfur dusts, which drift easily and can be breathed in. Don’t use sulfur if temperatures exceed 90°F, and don’t apply sulfur within 30 days of an oil spray. Sulfur is a skin irritant and eye and respiratory hazard, so always wear appropriate protective clothing.

 

 Beneficial insects 

 

For best results, make releases when pest levels are low to medium. ladybugs, lacewing and predatory mites are Some important natural enemies of the spider mite are:

 

Ladybugs

 

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14338-beneficial-bug-ladybugs/

 

Lacewing

 

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14337-beneficial-bug-green-lacewing-larvaeeggs/

 

Predatory mites

 

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14180-grow-hack-predatory-mites-on-the-attack/

 

Mite Destroyers

 

(I'll Put a link here when its ready)

 

Thrip's that eat spider mites sixspotted (Scolothrips sexmaculatus),  black hunter thrips (Aelothrips sp.) are found in tree fruit crops. They mainly prey on the eggs and young of spider mites and do not harm trees.

 

The link below will take you to "An Intro to benefical bugs and beneficial insect food" it has a list (been worked on) to pests and beneficial insects

 

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14334-an-intro-to-benefical-bugs-and-beneficial-insect-food/?p=124257


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How to control spider mites on marijuana plants: Keep it clean

 

Cannabis Cultivation Q&A: These common garden pests can take over quickly, so be as fastidious as possible

 

Jan. 23, 2017

 

By Jorge Cervantes, The Cannabist staff

Renowned grower Jorge Cervantes will answer readers’ questions and give advice on all things related to the cannabis plant. Got a question for Jorge? Email him at jorge@marijuanagrowing.com.

 

Editor’s Note: Laws for cultivating cannabis vary from state to state and city to city — before germinating any seeds or planting any clones, take care to learn what your local laws are.

 

*****

Question: I think my plants are infested with spider mites. How do I get rid of them?

Answer: The two-spotted spider mite is the most common pest mite to attack cannabis. Other pest mites include the hemp russet mite, broad mite, oriental mite, privet mite and more. This article focuses on the two-spotted one.

 

Spider mites are one of the most common pests in indoor gardens and greenhouses. Find them in dirty garden rooms and ill-kept greenhouses. Use a 10x to 30x handheld microscope to spot tiny mites (0.04-inch long) on the underside of leaves. Look closely and you can see the minute, translucent eggs.

 

Spider mites suck the life-giving sap from cannabis, causing loss of vigor and slow, stunted growth. The first sign most gardeners see, called stippling, appears on the tops of leaves as tiny white to yellow specks. By the time most gardeners see stippling on leaves, an infestation is well underway. Fertilized once for life, a female can lay 20 eggs a day. Eggs hatch in 3-4 days in warm weather. ...............

 

 

http://www.thecannabist.co/2017/01/23/control-spider-mites-marijuana-plants-keep-clean/63043/


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Okay, so I have a small indoor garden and I have been battling spider mites for a long time now I have used neem oil and it lessens the number of mites but it doesn't get rid of them all. I have to go in and spray them all everyday and even then it still doesn't fully treat them I can't use sulfer and I tried ladybugs all though nobody bothered to tell me that you can't use ladybugs within 30 days of neem oil. So thank you for that! And I i dont have the money to just throw away my only plants and start fresh now some plants are worse then others so I tried the bate plant idea and that just brought more into my room! I live next door too a fairly large operation and I don't know what they do for their pests but the past year they have gotten unbarible to keep up Outside let alone in my room! Is there anything else I can try?

 

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Okay, so I have a small indoor garden and I have been battling spider mites for a long time now I have used neem oil and it lessens the number of mites but it doesn't get rid of them all. I have to go in and spray them all everyday and even then it still doesn't fully treat them I can't use sulfer and I tried ladybugs all though nobody bothered to tell me that you can't use ladybugs within 30 days of neem oil. So thank you for that! And I i dont have the money to just throw away my only plants and start fresh now some plants are worse then others so I tried the bate plant idea and that just brought more into my room! I live next door too a fairly large operation and I don't know what they do for their pests but the past year they have gotten unbarible to keep up Outside let alone in my room! Is there anything else I can try?

 

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk

 

 

Since I started using AVID, spider mites haven't been a problem. Spray the plants when your light is about to go out. This is so your plants won't burn. my plants are sprayed twice in there life, once in the beginning of the grow cycle and and the end of grow cycle. The last spraying protects the plants from mites during there fragile flower cycle. Sometimes it's a good idea to move the GR to another location if you can.

 

 

predatory mites work also but it takes them awhile to get going

 

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14180-grow-hack-predatory-mites-on-the-attack/

 

 

info on the Mite destroyer

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14385-beneficial-bug-mite-destroyers/

 

It's also a good idea to clean your grow room after each grow. I mean a detail job: everything the walls, door, door knob, ceiling, lights (bulb, hood, cords, etc) floor ( if carpet, use a shampooer/deep clean vacuum also; I also have a sheet of plastic over the carpet tacked to the wall) , every single surface should be cleaned. I use beach and alcohol. During the grow keep it clean. sweep it remove any leaves/debris, clean the filters, wipe down all the surfaces. Before going in your GR, take a shower and put on clean cloths and different shoes.

 

Hope this helps


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Okay, so I have a small indoor garden and I have been battling spider mites for a long time now I have used neem oil and it lessens the number of mites but it doesn't get rid of them all. I have to go in and spray them all everyday and even then it still doesn't fully treat them I can't use sulfer and I tried ladybugs all though nobody bothered to tell me that you can't use ladybugs within 30 days of neem oil. So thank you for that! And I i dont have the money to just throw away my only plants and start fresh now some plants are worse then others so I tried the bate plant idea and that just brought more into my room! I live next door too a fairly large operation and I don't know what they do for their pests but the past year they have gotten unbarible to keep up Outside let alone in my room! Is there anything else I can try?

 

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk

 

Since I started using AVID, spider mites haven't been a problem. Spray the plants when your light is about to go out. This is so your plants won't burn. my plants are sprayed twice in there life, once in the beginning of the grow cycle and and the end of grow cycle. The last spraying protects the plants from mites during there fragile flower cycle. Sometimes it's a good idea to move the GR to another location if you can.

 

 

predatory mites work also but it takes them awhile to get going

 

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14180-grow-hack-predatory-mites-on-the-attack/

 

 

info on the Mite destroyer

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14385-beneficial-bug-mite-destroyers/

 

It's also a good idea to clean your grow room after each grow. I mean a detail job: everything the walls, door, door knob, ceiling, lights (bulb, hood, cords, etc) floor ( if carpet, use a shampooer/deep clean vacuum also; I also have a sheet of plastic over the carpet tacked to the wall) , every single surface should be cleaned. I use beach and alcohol. During the grow keep it clean. sweep it remove any leaves/debris, clean the filters, wipe down all the surfaces. Before going in your GR, take a shower and put on clean cloths and different shoes.

 

Hope this helps

Thank you so much I will definitely try that!

 

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk

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Okay, so I have a small indoor garden and I have been battling spider mites for a long time now I have used neem oil and it lessens the number of mites but it doesn't get rid of them all. I have to go in and spray them all everyday and even then it still doesn't fully treat them I can't use sulfer and I tried ladybugs all though nobody bothered to tell me that you can't use ladybugs within 30 days of neem oil. So thank you for that! And I i dont have the money to just throw away my only plants and start fresh now some plants are worse then others so I tried the bate plant idea and that just brought more into my room! I live next door too a fairly large operation and I don't know what they do for their pests but the past year they have gotten unbarible to keep up Outside let alone in my room! Is there anything else I can try?

 

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk

 

Since I started using AVID, spider mites haven't been a problem. Spray the plants when your light is about to go out. This is so your plants won't burn. my plants are sprayed twice in there life, once in the beginning of the grow cycle and and the end of grow cycle. The last spraying protects the plants from mites during there fragile flower cycle. Sometimes it's a good idea to move the GR to another location if you can.

 

 

predatory mites work also but it takes them awhile to get going

 

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14180-grow-hack-predatory-mites-on-the-attack/

 

 

info on the Mite destroyer

http://freemygreenpdx.com/topic/14385-beneficial-bug-mite-destroyers/

 

It's also a good idea to clean your grow room after each grow. I mean a detail job: everything the walls, door, door knob, ceiling, lights (bulb, hood, cords, etc) floor ( if carpet, use a shampooer/deep clean vacuum also; I also have a sheet of plastic over the carpet tacked to the wall) , every single surface should be cleaned. I use beach and alcohol. During the grow keep it clean. sweep it remove any leaves/debris, clean the filters, wipe down all the surfaces. Before going in your GR, take a shower and put on clean cloths and different shoes.

 

Hope this helps

Thank you so much I will definitely try that!

 

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk

 

 

 

Your welcome, it's no problem at all. I remember my battle with mites and losing whole crops

 

don't forget to make your intro. Here's the link    http://freemygreenpdx.com/forum/33-introductions/


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Okay, so I have a small indoor garden and I have been battling spider mites for a long time now I have used neem oil and it lessens the number of mites but it doesn't get rid of them all. I have to go in and spray them all everyday and even then it still doesn't fully treat them I can't use sulfer and I tried ladybugs all though nobody bothered to tell me that you can't use ladybugs within 30 days of neem oil. So thank you for that! And I i dont have the money to just throw away my only plants and start fresh now some plants are worse then others so I tried the bate plant idea and that just brought more into my room! I live next door too a fairly large operation and I don't know what they do for their pests but the past year they have gotten unbarible to keep up Outside let alone in my room! Is there anything else I can try?

 

Sent from my SM-S820L using Tapatalk

 

 

I use Floramite or Avid, neem will not kill mites and eggs. Only a powerful systemic will work. But you must use these 60 days before harvest, If your close to harvest then you wanna use a product like, Oxidate 

 

You can use Oxidate up to the day of harvest.

 

Keep us updated.

 

And, welcome to PIF

https://www.ebay.com/i/152588227773?chn=ps&dispItem=1

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