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eloquentsolution

finishing your oil extraction

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in the past few weeks, i have been asked to "clean up" some extractions gone awry.

 

in each of these extractions, water has been added, in effort to signal that the alcohol has been cooked out and the process is complete. when the water starts boiling the alcohol is gone, but left in it's place is water.

 

this poses two problems; the first being dilution of purity. when we are talking concentrates, it does not take much to alter percentage of canabinoids. water and wax are the two components that most dramatically alter the weight/concentration of the end product.

 

the oil cleaned yesterday actually lost over half its weight in water, wax and plant material. what started at 16.3 grams, i assumed to finish at about 10 to 12 grams, turned out to be 5.6 when the impurities were removed. for the few that may be purchasing water or wax, thinking the money they are spending is on life saving oil, this can be a serious moral and ethical issue.

 

the second and perhaps most critical problem is rancidity. those in the food industry know oil rancidity, due to moisture exposure, is the most common way to loose your oil. hash oil is no different. water in hash oil will eventually mold. rancidity happens long before that. if you are dropping water into your oil to determine when the alcohol is cooked out, store it in the refrigerator to save it from rancidity. better yet, use a thermometer instead of water.

 

water in oil is an emulsion and easy to spot, once you know what you are looking for. guys are familiar with water in crank case oil. it forms a milky like solution. hash oil exposed to water does the same thing. it is lighter in color and thicker in an odd way. if your oil is not translucent, it likely has moisture content and can go rancid if not used quickly (i don't know how fast) or refrigerated.

 

there is a second source of water that many miss. drying the material thoroughly prior to processing eliminates plant moisture that is extracted. dry your material to frangible, irrespective of time. decarboxylation happens at refinement, in the oil bath, unless you are refluxing which is a decarboxylation process.

 

i hope this helps inform. questions?

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002textThankYou_PkHrtsbyMai.gifgreat info

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in the past few weeks, i have been asked to "clean up" some extractions gone awry.

 

in each of these extractions, water has been added, in effort to signal that the alcohol has been cooked out and the process is complete. when the water starts boiling the alcohol is gone, but left in it's place is water.

 

this poses two problems; the first being dilution of purity. when we are talking concentrates, it does not take much to alter percentage of canabinoids. water and wax are the two components that most dramatically alter the weight/concentration of the end product.

 

the oil cleaned yesterday actually lost over half its weight in water, wax and plant material. what started at 16.3 grams, i assumed to finish at about 10 to 12 grams, turned out to be 5.6 when the impurities were removed. for the few that may be purchasing water or wax, thinking the money they are spending is on life saving oil, this can be a serious moral and ethical issue.

 

the second and perhaps most critical problem is rancidity. those in the food industry know oil rancidity, due to moisture exposure, is the most common way to loose your oil. hash oil is no different. water in hash oil will eventually mold. rancidity happens long before that. if you are dropping water into your oil to determine when the alcohol is cooked out, store it in the refrigerator to save it from rancidity. better yet, use a thermometer instead of water.

 

water in oil is an emulsion and easy to spot, once you know what you are looking for. guys are familiar with water in crank case oil. it forms a milky like solution. hash oil exposed to water does the same thing. it is lighter in color and thicker in an odd way. if your oil is not translucent, it likely has moisture content and can go rancid if not used quickly (i don't know how fast) or refrigerated.

 

there is a second source of water that many miss. drying the material thoroughly prior to processing eliminates plant moisture that is extracted. dry your material to frangible, irrespective of time. decarboxylation happens at refinement, in the oil bath, unless you are refluxing which is a decarboxylation process.

 

i hope this helps inform. questions?

no q. just yet, but just wait.

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Good point ES!

 

It isn't necessary to add water to drive up the boiling point. If you set your container of oil in 250F hot oil, bath, it will never get hotter than about ~172F until the alcohol is gone and then it goes up to 250F.

 

When you set it in a hot oil bath, the first larger irregularly sized bubbles are the solvent and then you get a bunch of small regularly shaped bubbles, which are CO2 from decarboxylation.

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