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Found 64 results

  1. EDDIEKIRK

    Diabetes

    Diabetes Diabetes is a condition wherein the body either produces inadequate amounts of insulin or fails to utilize available insulin properly. An estimated 1 million Americans suffer from Type 1 diabetes, which develops in childhood. Another 15 million suffer from Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult onset diabetes, which develops later in life. Symptoms generally include an imbalance of blood sugar levels and a high level of sugar excreted through the urine. Initial studies showed that cannabis has no effect on blood sugar levels. A recent test-tube study showed that very high doses of synthetic THC might aggravate diabetes, but that same research also indicates that continued use of cannabis creates a tolerance to the potential aggravation. [ii] No human studies have found that cannabis or synthetic cannabinoids contribute to symptoms of diabetes. At the same time, no human studies have been undertaken to prove or disprove the reports of long-term diabetics who claim that cannabis use causes an immediate lowering of abnormally high blood sugar levels. [iii] Some diabetics also claim that cannabis helps stabilize blood sugar levels and maintain mental stability, or correct mood swings caused by fluctuating blood sugar levels. [iv] Separating the apparent blood sugar response from the anti-anorexic properties of cannabis is currently a matter for further investigation. Diabetics are frequently instructed to refrain from alcohol use because of its high caloric content. Cannabis may provide a psychologically valuable alternative to alcohol in stress reduction, a major factor in managing the potentially life threatening symptoms of diabetes. Hence, cannabis may function in several ways to reduce and stabilize blood sugar levels for patients suffering from diabetes. However, regardless of mounting anecdotal evidence in medical practice, including medical testimony before a district court in California, [v] no scientific papers have been published on the effectiveness of cannabis in treating diabetes. While cannabis has been used as a replacement for insulin, diabetics are strongly advised to continue their physician’s prescribed treatment plan. Maugh, “Inhaled formed of insulin passes first test.” Los Angeles Times/Seattle Times, June 17, 1998 [ii] Hollister, “Health aspects of marijuana.” Pharmacological Review, Vol. 38, No. 1, 1986 [iii] Grinspoon, “Anecdotal surveys on diabetes.” The Forbidden Medicine Website, http://www.rxmarijuana.com [iv] Diabetic reports from Seattle and from the Sonoma Alliance for Medical Marijuana, 1998 [v] “Pot garden’s size brought case to court.” Sonoma Union Democrat (California), March 19, 1998 Drinking Chamomile Tea May Help Fight Complications Of Diabetes ScienceDaily (Sep. 16, 2008) — Drinking chamomile tea daily with meals may help prevent the complications of diabetes, which include loss of vision, nerve damage, and kidney damage, researchers in Japan and the United Kingdom are reporting. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The findings could lead to the development of a new chamomile-based drug for type 2 diabetes, which is at epidemic levels in this country and spreading worldwide, they note. Their study appears in the Sept. 10 issue of the ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication. In the new study, Atsushi Kato and colleagues point out that chamomile, also known as manzanilla, has been used for years as a medicinal cure-all to treat a variety of medical problems including stress, colds, and menstrual cramps. Scientists recently proposed that the herbal tea might also be beneficial for fighting diabetes, but the theory hasn't been scientifically tested until now. To find out, the researchers fed chamomile extract to a group of diabetic rats for 21 days and compared the results to a group of control animals on a normal diet. The chamomile-supplemented animals showed a significant decrease in blood glucose levels compared with the controls, they say. The extract also showed significant inhibition of both ALR2 enzymes and sorbitol, whose elevated levels are associated with increased diabetic complications, the scientists say. source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/...80915164519.htm Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoid Reduces Incidence Of Diabetes, Study Says Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoid Reduces Incidence Of Diabetes, Study Says - NORML Marijuana Compound May Help Stop Diabetic Retinopathy Marijuana Compound May Help Stop Diabetic Retinopathy Anticoagulant Effects of a Cannabis Extract in an Obese Rat Model Anticoagulant effects of a Cannabis extract in an obese rat model. Neuroprotective and Blood-Retinal Barrier-Preserving Effects of Cannabidiol Neuroprotective and Blood-Retinal Barrier-Preserving Effects of Cannabidiol in Experimental Diabetes -- El-Remessy et al. 168 (1): 235 -- American Journal of Pathology The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conten...00013/art00008 Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on blood glucose, plasma insulin and hepatic key enzymes Unbound MEDLINE | Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on blood glucose, plasma insulin and hepatic key enzymes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Journal article Cannabidiol reduces the development of diabetes in an animal study IACM-Bulletin Getting Eye On Cannabinoids Getting Eye On Cannabinoids: The Hempire - [cannabis, britain] Marijuana compound could prevent eye damage in diabetics Marijuana compound could prevent eye damage in diabetics: The Hempire - [cannabis, hemp] The synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 attenuates neural damage in diabetic mice Diabetes | Evolutionism | Dr. Bob Melamede Cannabidiol arrests onset of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice CSA: Cannabis Research - Diabetes Cannabidiol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial cell inflammatory response and barrier disruption Cannabidiol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial cell inflammatory response and barrier disruption Biological effects of THC and a lipophilic cannabis extract on normal and insulin resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes Unbound MEDLINE | Biological effects of THC and a lipophilic cannabis extract on normal and insulin resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Journal article Beneficial effects of a Cannabis sativa extract on diabetes induced neuropathy and oxidative stress. Unbound MEDLINE | Beneficial effects of a Cannabis sativa extract treatment on diabetes-induced neuropathy and oxidative stress. Journal article Beneficial effects of a Cannabis sativa extract treatment on diabetes-induced neuropathy and oxidative stress. Unbound MEDLINE | Beneficial effects of a Cannabis sativa extract treatment on diabetes-induced neuropathy and oxidative stress. Journal article Happy reading!
  2. Version 02

    29 downloads

    US- Patent! "Anti-nausea And Anti-vomiting Activity Of Cannabidiol Compounds "
  3. People globally enjoy partaking in the pungent flowers of the Cannabis plant, seeking the euphoric psycho-activity unique to this plant, whether for pain relief, pleasure or pastime. Many people though are unaware of the amazing benefits of Raw, organic Cannabis Juice. In raw form, Cannabis leaves and the tri-chrome covered flowers are concentrated with non-psychoactive, anti-biotic, anti-fungal, anti-viral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immune-regulating and anti-cancer nutrient compounds including lesser-known Tetrahydrocannabicannabidiol (CBD), and Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) both of which are proving to be therapeutic substances capable of preventing and/or reversing a plethora of chronic and debilitating illnesses. When you begin juicing “raw” cannabis, you will consume cannabinoids in their acid forms. The raw form of CBD is CBDA or cannabidiolic acid. The raw form of THC is THCA or tetrahydrocannabinolic acid. These are the A arrangements of the molecules, the non-psychoactive forms. The acids of this plant are not psychoactive unless they are decarboxylated, or heated. When decarboxylation takes place the acids are converted to Δ9-THC and CBD. Recently CBD is making waves in research, being regarding as a highly medicinal substance with unique immune-regulating capabilities. The human body already contains an endogenous cannabinoid system, complete with different types of cannabinoid receptors, introducing cannabinoids to your systems can help normalize the body's functions, including cellular communication, regeneration and repair, as well as regulating immune function. JUICING WORKS! Because it provides the cannabinoid acids, which are potent anti-inflammatory compounds that help activate and regulate the endocannabinoid system. When you juicing is done properly, you should not have to worry about psycho-activity. Though preparing the juice improperly may lead to heating the solution and causing THC to form, this can be said of pasteurization, even flash pasteurization. I utilize the power of raw Cannabis in juiced form myself. This juice possesses a powerful grassy taste, definitely lacking in the flavor department. It is best mixed into a smoothie for those with sensitive palates, chased with apple juice or lemonade or just straight for veterans and die-hards. No matter the taste, it is worth the power-house of nutrients found within. Canna Juicers will notice a strong increase in energy levels, feeling invigorated almost immediately. I am unsure as to why this amount of energy is produced, I am pretty sure it has something to do with the metabolism of the acid components of the juice, leaving it exceptionally beneficial to those with chronic-fatigue issues. This juice has appetite suppressant qualities, as you do not feel the urge to eat as often, and there are no “munchies” associated with raw Cannabis juice. One downfall is, in its raw form Cannabis Juice does not have a long-shelf life. The neon-green juice begins to turn the mucky-brown of oxidation about as quickly as an apple once bitten into. I would not recommend keeping juice longer than 12 hours as the nutritional value begins to degrade. You are able to store the juice in the freezer for a period of 6-12 months, though fresh is best! My friend and Juicing Guru, Dr. William Courtney, of Mendocino County California recommends that patients juice 15-20 leaves per day. Cannabis leaves have the highest CBD levels, and therefore are the best for juicing. Prime juicing material is found when the plants are between 70-85 days old. He believes that individuals with compromised immune systems from autoimmune disorders, cellular dysfunction, chronic inflammation, cancer and various other illnesses can derive a wide range of health-promoting benefits by consuming organic raw Cannabis Juice. I believe that Cannabis, and the compounds found within are vital nutrients missing from our modern, prohibitionist, western diet. Give raw, organic Cannabis juicing a try, feel the benefits for yourself, and then share the news with your friends and loved ones. Don’t be afraid to cure yourself! Cannadad
  4. From the album: Bud Bubbles

    Bud Bubbles are glass clear resin orbs with a centered cannabis flower bud encapsulated inside. The resin we use allows each perfectly centered flower bud to show off and magnify its beauty. In addition, you can see even the finest details thanks to added optical brighteners, that not only give the look and hardness of glass, but also resist yellowing over time, unlike many other resins. We strive for perfection here at Bud Bubbles and try our best to remove any, and in most cases, all of the bubbles from our orbs. However, since each orb is lovingly handcrafted, imperfections can happen from time to time. So if a bubble happens to find its way into your orb, we promise it won't take away from its beauty or detail! CHECK THEM OUT HERE https://www.etsy.com/shop/BUDBUBBLES?ref=hdr_shop_menu
  5. Lush LED Lighting

    Showcasing Lush Lighting LED Grown Buds!

    This thread is to showcase big, Lush buds. All photos posted here by me were grown with Lush Lighting LED grow lights. So, sit back and enjoy!
  6. Hi OMMP! Names Ryland, I am 24! Thanks for the forum welcoming. I guess I will get straight to the point if their is anyone who needs this! Sometimes the stars align, ya know? I am ready to work, and am mobile and able for any area of Portland. That is including the city, and outside of it including Tigard or Beaverton, or the surrounding areas. I am able and experienced in cultivation. I have a background in Sales so I am immediately available for any customer relations, clerk, sales representative, and tending positions that are available for cannabis shops as well. I have experience in Indoor with mainly HPS, but have used MH, or LED. I have used t5 and t8 Fluorescents- especially for vegetation. As seen in the photos I have also grown and harvested outdoor using only organic nutrients, fertile soil, and started from both seed and clone. I have used and am knowledgeable of nutrient systems such as Advanced Nutrients, Botanicare, Foxfarm, SensiBloom, etc... I have also grown in most mediums, including not only the common foxfarm soil, happy frog, sunshine mix #4.etc but also cocoa, hydroton, rockwool, sure2grow cubes, and have dabbled/experimented in Aeroponic-fish fed based plant systems. I am also very willing to do physical labor. I find it cathartic to transfer plants, work outside-I love helping plants reach their highest potential-sustaining a perfect Ph Balance or PPM, and maintaining a healthy, pest free, mildew free, oxygenated environment. When convenient for you, please contact xxx-xxx-5769. Please contact me at LucidRoot@Gmail.com or the number above! I am ready for work and that is of any type. Sales to Soil! -Ryland Root
  7. popeye!

    Oregon Organic Elites

    Hey farmer's I just wanted to start a Lil post I'm gonna be updating it as often as I can. I'm a Oregon Medical Marijuana Patient and Grower who appreciates quality medicine grown in quality organic methods! I like to do AACT (Activated Aerated Compost Teas) and I use dry raw organic nutrients no bottles. In the garden right now I have King Louis XIII OG, Katsu`s Bubba Kush, East Coast Sour Diesel, Platinum Animal Cookies aka 09 cut, Critical Jack and Violet Delight the critical jack and violet will be verging a while longer and will be in the next round. I appreciate quality organic cannabis and I'm always striving to get better I hope to get to know people at the farm more and I hope to make some new like minded friends! I will be working on posting a few pictures later today or tomorrow so please stay tuned thank you
  8. Register to vote and sign the petition! Berrien County residents! Free stuff, raffles, face painting, music (DJ), car wash, tie dye station, freebies from Lush Lighting and Vape & Smoke. All in Belle Plaza, Niles, MI. Saturday, July 25, 2015. Noon-4pm! Join us!
  9. terranova

    Living Soil Cannabis - Omni Naturals

    Terranova here, From a new land far far away where there are no "products" and "enhancers" just nature, and smart observation. :Big Grin: Been anxious to start posting on the local forums. I'm looking forward to helping people out with getting symbiotic gardens going where you plug in to nature, and the true needs of your plants. This first post will be just a few shots of the plants in the flower room. Everything here is owned by my good friend @kushsyndicate but I am running the living soil plants this round, and its a pleasure to share a peek into our garden.. Check out some of the cuts in rotation...Around day 10 flower. ECSD - East Coast Sour Diesel (Gift from Khaosgardenz aka popeye! himself, one of my most prized plants for a long time no doubt) Platinum Animal Cookies '09 Cut Skywalker OG - G Cut Rez's Sour - Reservoir Seeds Cinex - The other cut Mango - BCBD or Soma...no idea I'll post an update with my next enzyme application. If anybody has questions, please feel free I'm all ears. Thanks again for having me, and a special thanks to Khaosgardenz for pointing me in this direction. TN
  10. From the album: EDDIEKIRK

    Potential Therapeutic Uses of medical Cannabis

    © Eddie Kirk

  11. Lush LED Lighting

    Store Grand Opening

    Grand opening of the new Lush Lighting retail store. Oct. 29, 2014.

    © Lush Lighting, Inc. 2014

  12. Lush LED Lighting

    Method Seven

    Coming soon! New Method Seven LED glasses made exclusively for Lush Lighting! Get yours and see the difference!
  13. Lush LED Lighting

    Frosted Lush Grown3

    © Lush Lighting, Inc. 2014

  14. Lush LED Lighting

    Lush Bathing

    A little Lush-bathing bringing out the Power of Purple!

    © Lush Lighting, Inc. 2014

  15. Introduction to the Endocannabinoid System Dustin Sulak, DO Maine Integrative Healthcare As you read this review of the scientific literature regarding the therapeutic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids, one thing will become quickly evident: cannabis has a profound influence on the human body. This one herb and its variety of therapeutic compounds seem to affect every aspect of our bodies and minds. How is this possible? In my integrative medicine clinic in central Maine, we treat over a thousand patients with a huge diversity of diseases and symptoms. In one day I might see cancer, Crohn’s disease, epilepsy, chronic pain, multiple sclerosis, insomnia, Tourette’s syndrome and eczema, just to name a few. All of these conditions have different causes, different physiologic states, and vastly different symptoms. The patients are old and young. Some are undergoing conventional therapy. Others are on a decidedly alternative path. Yet despite their differences, almost all of my patients would agree on one point: cannabis helps their condition. As a physician, I am naturally wary of any medicine that purports to cure-all. Panaceas, snake-oil remedies, and expensive fads often come and go, with big claims but little scientific or clinical evidence to support their efficacy. As I explore the therapeutic potential of cannabis, however, I find no lack of evidence. In fact, I find an explosion of scientific research on the therapeutic potential of cannabis, more evidence than one can find on some of the most widely used therapies of conventional medicine. At the time of writing, a PubMed search for scientific journal articles published in the last 20 years containing the word “cannabis” revealed 7,704 results. Add the word “cannabinoid,” and the results increase to 15,899 articles. That’s an average of more than two scientific publications per day over the last 20 years! These numbers not only illustrate the present scientific interest and financial investment in understanding more about cannabis and its components, but they also emphasize the need for high quality reviews and summaries such as the document you are about to read. How can one herb help so many different conditions? How can it provide both palliative and curative actions? How can it be so safe while offering such powerful effects? The search to answer these questions has led scientists to the discovery of a previously unknown physiologic system, a central component of the health and healing of every human and almost every animal: the endocannabinoid system. What Is The Endocannabinoid System?The endogenous cannabinoid system, named after the plant that led to its discovery, is perhaps the most important physiologic system involved in establishing and maintaining human health. Endocannabinoids and their receptors are found throughout the body: in the brain, organs, connective tissues, glands, and immune cells. In each tissue, the cannabinoid system performs different tasks, but the goal is always the same: homeostasis, the maintenance of a stable internal environment despite fluctuations in the external environment. Cannabinoids promote homeostasis at every level of biological life, from the sub-cellular, to the organism, and perhaps to the community and beyond. Here’s one example: autophagy, a process in which a cell sequesters part of its contents to be self-digested and recycled, is mediated by the cannabinoid system. While this process keeps normal cells alive, allowing them to maintain a balance between the synthesis, degradation, and subsequent recycling of cellular products, it has a deadly effect on malignant tumor cells, causing them to consume themselves in a programmed cellular suicide. The death of cancer cells, of course, promotes homeostasis and survival at the level of the entire organism. Endocannabinoids and cannabinoids are also found at the intersection of the body’s various systems, allowing communication and coordination between different cell types. At the site of an injury, for example, cannabinoids can be found decreasing the release of activators and sensitizers from the injured tissue, stabilizing the nerve cell to prevent excessive firing, and calming nearby immune cells to prevent release of pro-inflammatory substances. Three different mechanisms of action on three different cell types for a single purpose: minimize the pain and damage caused by the injury. The endocannabinoid system, with its complex actions in our immune system, nervous system, and all of the body’s organs, is literally a bridge between body and mind. By understanding this system we begin to see a mechanism that explains how states of consciousness can promote health or disease. In addition to regulating our internal and cellular homeostasis, cannabinoids influence a person’s relationship with the external environment. Socially, the administration of cannabinoids clearly alters human behavior, often promoting sharing, humor, and creativity. By mediating neurogenesis, neuronal plasticity, and learning, cannabinoids may directly influence a person’s open-mindedness and ability to move beyond limiting patterns of thought and behavior from past situations. Reformatting these old patterns is an essential part of health in our quickly changing environment. What Are Cannabinoid Receptors?Sea squirts, tiny nematodes, and all vertebrate species share the endocannabinoid system as an essential part of life and adaptation to environmental changes. By comparing the genetics of cannabinoid receptors in different species, scientists estimate that the endocannabinoid system evolved in primitive animals over 600 million years ago.......... more at,..... http://emeraldwellnesscoop.com/2013/07/23/introduction-to-the-endocannabinoid-system/
  16. THIS IS THE HIDDEN PICTURE OF THE ZIPPO LIGHTER BRING US THIS LINK AND YOU WIN THE LIGHTER SHOWN AS WELL AS FREE SHIPPING/ (must be a private member to claim prize) Contest won 2-2-2014 by soulreaper Why you should injest cannabis if you have MS, arthritis, epilepsy,spinal cord injury, stroke etc. A doctor told me that those who have immune system disorders (ie. lupus, rheumatoid arthritis) or any disease that affects the brain (neurons) like ALS, alzheimers, parkinsons, epilepsy, etc. should be injesting cannabis...either with tincture, capsules, medibles, edibles etc. Cannabis works over 4 times stronger when injested. You can just juice mature leaves, or cook the leaf/bud mix in with alcohol or fat because it's alcohol/fat soluable. I can't stand the taste, so I prefer capsules! Having said you need to be injesting.....you have to be VERY careful not to overdose. It is not an experience you ever want to repeat. If you are new to injesting, ask those who have had experience with it. Injest only with experienced friends. Some panic and go to the er where they can't do anything for you an experienced person could do. Which is to lie down, try to drink and eat or go to sleep(if you're lucky)!! So what I've learned is to take a drop (if it's tinc you prefer) before bedtime and see how it hits you. If you don't notice it, do 2 drops the next night. Ditto until you find the dose for you. I've had patients that could only take a drop for the first week. Now they are up to a teaspoon 4 times a day! Another thing I learned from the medical marijuana conference is that if you take hemp milk or hemp protein powder or hemp nuts...anything hemp along with your cannabis, they help boost the effects of cannabis. Never seen the stuff you ask!! I've seen it at Fred Meyers, new seasons & whole foods (aka whole paycheck)! Sorry if this is redundant! Happy, safe, effective medicating!
  17. Cannabinoids for Fibromyalgia Syndrome FibroAction has got an article discussing a recent journal article from Fibromyalgia Syndrome (Fibro) expert, Dr Roland Staud MD, and EB Koo, an undergraduate student at the University of Florida, discussing whether cannabinoids are a new treatment option for Fibromyalgia Syndrome. This is in light of the study by Skrabek et al, who carried out what was apparently the first randomized, controlled trial to assess the benefit of nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid, on pain reduction and quality of life improvement in patients with Fibro. FibroAction is a new organisation, basd in the UK, which aims to make accurate, up-to-date information about Fibromyalgia Syndrome (Fibro) readily available, as well as raise awareness of the condition. My link Cannabinoids for Fibromyalgia Syndrome An article has been e-published ahead of print in the journal Nature Clinical Practice. Rheumatology by Fibromyalgia Syndrome expert, Dr Roland Staud MD, and EB Koo, an undergraduate student at the University of Florida, discussing whether cannabinoids are a new treatment option for Fibromyalgia Syndrome. [1] Dr Staud, author of 'Fibromyalgia for Dummies', is Professor of Medicine at the College of Medicine and Director of the Center for Musculoskeletal Pain Research at the University of Florida. The article discusses cannabinoids as a treatment option for Fibromyalgia Syndrome in light of the study by Skrabek et al, discussed in an article in the February issue of the Journal of Pain. [2] Skrabek et al carried out what was apparently the first randomized, controlled trial to assess the benefit of nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid, on pain reduction and quality of life improvement in patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome. [2] The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out on 40 patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome. The primary outcome measure, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and the secondary outcome measures, number of tender points, the average tender point pain threshold, and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), were evaluated at 2 and 4 weeks into the trial and then again after a 4-week washout period. [2] Skrabek et al's trial found that there were significant decreases in the VAS (-2.04, P < .02), FIQ (-12.07, P < .02), and anxiety (-1.67, P < .02) in the nabilone treated group at 4 weeks, and that after the 4-week wash-out period, all benefits were lost, with the nabilone treated group returning to their baseline levels of pain and quality of life. There were no significant improvements in the placebo group. The treatment group experienced more side effects per person at 2 and 4 weeks (1.58, P < .02 and 1.54, P < .05), respectively, and although nabilone was not associated with serious adverse effects, some patients did experience drowsiness, dry mouth, vertigo and ataxia. [2] Skrabek et al said that: "Nabilone appears to be a beneficial, well-tolerated treatment option for fibromyalgia patients, with significant benefits in pain relief and functional improvement. ... As nabilone improved symptoms and was well-tolerated, it may be a useful adjunct for pain management in fibromyalgia." Nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid, is used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients who do not respond well to other anti-emetics. However, it has also been studied for use in treating cancer pain and neuropathic pain. Cannabinoids are chemicals that are structurally similar to cannabis or THC (the main psychoactive substance found in cannabis), or that bind to cannabinoid receptors. References: Staud R, Koo EB. Are cannabinoids a new treatment option for pain in patients with fibromyalgia? Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol. 2008 Jun 3. [Epub ahead of print]. Skrabek RQ, Galimova L, Ethans K, Perry D. Nabilone for the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia. J Pain. 2008 Feb;9(2):164-73. Epub 2007 Nov 5. Fibromyalgia and Alternative Treatments From acupuncture to chiropractic, from massage to meditation, alternative treatments are in great demand. That's especially true for people with pain-related illnesses such as fibromyalgia. Alternative medicine, including herbal therapy and homeopathy, is a form of "drug-free" doctoring that views the mind and body as a fully integrated system. For people with fibromyalgia, some alternative treatments work well. That's because holistic therapies influence your total being. In that way, they may allow you to reduce your medications and increase your normal activities. Study findings show that standard acupuncture may be effective in treating some people with fibromyalgia. Both biofeedback and electroacupuncture have also been used for relief of fibromyalgia symptoms. However, before you try alternative treatments, talk with your doctor. Check to see what limitations might apply to you. Working with your doctor, you can find an acceptable way to blend conventional medicine with alternative treatments or natural remedies. When you do, you may be able to increase restful sleep and reduce your fibromyalgia pain. Can acupuncture treat fibromyalgia? With acupuncture, a practitioner inserts one or more dry needles into the skin and underlying tissues at specific points. Gently twisting or otherwise manipulating the needles causes a measurable release of endorphins into the bloodstream. Endorphins are the body's natural opioids. In addition, according to acupuncture practitioners, energy blocks are removed. Removing them is said to restore the flow of energy along the meridians, which are specific energy channels. Studies show that acupuncture may alter brain chemistry. It appears to do this by changing the release of neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters stimulate or inhibit nerve impulses in the brain that relay information about external stimuli and sensations such as pain. In this way, the patient's pain tolerance is increased. One acupuncture treatment in some patients may last weeks to help alleviate chronic pain. What is electroacupuncture? Electroacupuncture is another way of stimulating the acupuncture points. It uses a needle hooked up to small wires connected to very slight electrical currents. Heat - moxibustion -- and massage - acupressure -- can also be used during this electroacupuncture process. Laser acupuncture is yet another offshoot of this alternative therapy. It may occasionally be effective for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. While it uses the same points, there are no needles involved. There are precautions to take if you want to try acupuncture. First, make sure you find a licensed acupuncturist who has a lot of experience. Also, make sure the acupuncturist uses only disposable needles. There are multiple styles of acupuncture. The style used depends on where the practitioner studied. For instance, Chinese acupuncture depends on larger bore needles and the practitioner may be more aggressive with moving them. Japanese acupuncture uses thinner bore needles with a relatively gentle approach. You'll need to find the style that suits your fibromyalgia needs. My link Marijuana Ingredient May Cut Fibromyalgia Pain Preliminary Study Shows Less Pain, Better Quality of Life in Fibromyalgia Patients Taking Nabilone By Miranda Hitti WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MDFeb. 19, 2008 -- Nabilone, a pain drug based on marijuana's active ingredient, may ease fibromyalgia pain. So say Canadian researchers, based on a preliminary, short-term study. The study included 40 fibromyalgia patients. First, they did three things: Rate the intensity of their fibromyalgia pain. The rating scale ranged from 0 (no pain) to 10 (the worst pain imaginable). Their average rating was about 6. Rate their quality of life. The rating scale ranged from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating worse quality of life. Their average rating was 66. Get a check of their tender points -- parts of the body that are often sensitive in fibromyalgia patients. The researchers then split the patients into two groups. For a month, one group of patients took nabilone daily. The other group took a placebo pill. The patients didn't know which pill they were taking. After a month of nabilone treatment, fibromyalgia pain was less intense and quality of life had improved. No such changes were seen with the placebo. Nabilone treatment didn't affect the patients' number of tender points. And it didn't cure fibromyalgia pain -- when patients stopped taking nabilone, their fibromyalgia pain returned to its former intensity. Nabilone was well tolerated, but side effects were more commonly reported in the nabilone group. Those side effects -- which included drowsiness, dry mouth, vertigo, and movement problems -- were "generally mild," write the researchers. Longer studies are needed to track the long-term effects, note the University of Manitoba's Ryan Quinlan Skrabek, MD, and colleagues. Their study appears in the February edition of The Journal of Pain. source: http://www.webmd.com/fibromyalgia/news/200...?src=RSS_PUBLIC Pot Drug May Cut Fibromyalgia Pain Preliminary Study Shows Less Pain, Better Quality of Life in Fibromyalgia Patients Taking Nabilone By Miranda Hitti WebMD Health News Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD Feb. 19, 2008 -- Nabilone, a pain drug based on marijuana's active ingredient, may ease fibromyalgia pain. So say Canadian researchers, based on a preliminary, short-term study. The study included 40 fibromyalgia patients. First, they did three things: Rate the intensity of their fibromyalgia pain. The rating scale ranged from 0 (no pain) to 10 (the worst pain imaginable). Their average rating was about 6. Rate their quality of life. The rating scale ranged from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating worse quality of life. Their average rating was 66. Get a check of their tender points -- parts of the body that are often sensitive in fibromyalgia patients. The researchers then split the patients into two groups. For a month, one group of patients took nabilone daily. The other group took a placebo pill. The patients didn't know which pill they were taking. After a month of nabilone treatment, fibromyalgia pain was less intense and quality of life had improved. No such changes were seen with the placebo. Nabilone treatment didn't affect the patients' number of tender points. And it didn't cure fibromyalgia pain -- when patients stopped taking nabilone, their fibromyalgia pain returned to its former intensity. Nabilone was well tolerated, but side effects were more commonly reported in the nabilone group. Those side effects -- which included drowsiness, dry mouth, vertigo, and movement problems -- were "generally mild," write the researchers. Longer studies are needed to track the long-term effects, note the University of Manitoba's Ryan Quinlan Skrabek, MD, and colleagues. Their study appears in the February edition of The Journal of Pain. SOURCES: Skrabek, R. The Journal of Pain, February 2008; vol 9: pp 164-173. © 2008 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved. source: http://www.rxlist.co...rticlekey=87306 Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD): can this concept explain therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions? Russo EB. Source GW Pharmaceuticals, 2235 Wylie Avenue, Missoula, MT 59802, USA. erusso@montanadsl.net Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study examines the concept of clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD), and the prospect that it could underlie the pathophysiology of migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and other functional conditions alleviated by clinical cannabis. METHODS: Available literature was reviewed, and literature searches pursued via the National Library of Medicine database and other resources. RESULTS: Migraine has numerous relationships to endocannabinoid function. Anandamide (AEA) potentiates 5-HT1A and inhibits 5-HT2A receptors supporting therapeutic efficacy in acute and preventive migraine treatment. Cannabinoids also demonstrate dopamine-blocking and anti-inflammatory effects. AEA is tonically active in the periaqueductal gray matter, a migraine generator. THC modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission via NMDA receptors. Fibromyalgia is now conceived as a central sensitization state with secondary hyperalgesia. Cannabinoids have similarly demonstrated the ability to block spinal, peripheral and gastrointestinal mechanisms that promote pain in headache, fibromyalgia, IBS and related disorders. The past and potential clinical utility of cannabis-based medicines in their treatment is discussed, as are further suggestions for experimental investigation of CECD via CSF examination and neuro-imaging. CONCLUSION: Migraine, fibromyalgia, IBS and related conditions display common clinical, biochemical and pathophysiological patterns that suggest an underlying clinical endocannabinoid deficiency that may be suitably treated with cannabinoid medicines. Republished from Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2004 Feb-Apr;25(1-2):31-9. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology. The disease is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and multiple tender points in the neck, spine, shoulders and hips. An estimated 3 to 6 million Americans are afflicted by fibromyalgia, which is often poorly controlled by standard pain medications. Fibromyalgia patients frequently self-report using cannabis therapeutically to treat symptoms of the disease,[1-2] and physicians – in instances where it is legal for them do so – often recommend the use of cannabis to treat musculoskeletal disorders.[3-4] To date however, there are few clinical trials assessing the use of cannabinoids to treat the disease. Previous clinical and preclinical trials have shown that both naturally occurring and endogenous cannabinoids hold analgesic qualities,[9-12] particularly in the treatment of pain resistant to conventional pain therapies. (Please see the 'Chronic Pain' section of this book for further details.) As a result, some experts have suggested that cannabinoids are potentially applicable for the treatment of chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia,[13] and have theorized that the disease may be associated with an underlying clinical deficiency of the endocannabinoid system.[14] REFERENCES [1] Swift et al. 2005. Survey of Australians using cannabis for medical purposes. Harm Reduction Journal 4: 2-18. [2] Ware et al. 2005. The medicinal use of cannabis in the UK: results of a nationwide survey. International Journal of Clinical Practice 59: 291-295. [3] Dale Gieringer. 2001. Medical use of cannabis: experience in California. In: Grotenhermen and Russo (Eds). Cannabis and Cannabinoids: Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutic Potential. New York: Haworth Press: 153-170. [4] Gorter et al. 2005. Medical use of cannabis in the Netherlands. Neurology 64: 917-919. [5] Schley et al. 2006. Delta-9-THC based monotherapy in fibromyalgia patients on experimentally induced pain, axon reflex flare, and pain relief. Current Medical Research and Opinion 22: 1269-1276. [6] Skrabek et al. 2008. Nabilone for the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia. The Journal of Pain 9: 164-173. <a href="http://norml.org/library/item/fibromyalgia#b7">[7] Ware et al. 2010. The effects of nabilone on sleep in fibromyalgia: results of a randomized controlled trial. Anesthesia and Analgesia 110: 604-610. [8] Fiz et al. 2011. Cannabis use in patients with fibromyalgia: Effect on symptoms relief and health-related quality of life. PLoS One 6. [9] Burns and Ineck. 2006. Cannabinoid analgesia as a potential new therapeutic option in the treatment of chronic pain. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy 40: 251-260. [10] David Secko. 2005. Analgesia through endogenous cannabinoids. CMAJ 173. [11] Wallace et al. 2007. Dose-dependent effects of smoked cannabis on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia in healthy volunteers. Anesthesiology 107:785-96. [12] Cox et al. 2007. Synergy between delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine in the arthritic rat. European Journal of Pharmacology 567: 125-130. [13] Lynch and Campbell. 2011. op. cit. [14] Ethan Russo. 2004. Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD): Can this concept explain therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions? Neuroendocrinology Letters 25: 31-39. My link
  18. Study: Cannabinoid Reduces Breast Cancer Cell Aggression Saturday, November 24 2007 @ 12:31 AM EST Edited by: Michael Hess Cannabidiol may be helpful in reducing the aggressiveness of breast cancer cells BBSNews 2007-11-24 -- (IACM) In a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer the natural non- psychotropic cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) reduced the aggressiveness of breast cancer cells. CBD inhibited a protein called Id-1. Id proteins play an important role in tumour cell biology. The researchers of the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute concluded that "CBD represents the first nontoxic exogenous agent that can significantly decrease Id- 1 expression in metastatic breast cancer cells leading to the down-regulation of tumor aggressiveness." The authors stressed that they were not suggesting patients smoke cannabis. They added that it would be highly unlikely that effective concentrations of CBD could be reached by smoking cannabis. Lead researcher Dr. Sean McAllister said: "Right now we have a limited range of options in treating aggressive forms of cancer. Those treatments, such as chemotherapy, can be effective but they can also be extremely toxic and difficult for patients. This compound offers the hope of a non-toxic therapy that could achieve the same results without any of the painful side effects." (Sources: BBC News of 19 November 2007; McAllister SD, Christian RT, Horowitz MP, Garcia A, Desprez PY. Cannabidiol as a novel inhibitor of Id-1 gene expression in aggressive breast cancer cells. Mol Cancer Ther 2007;6(11):2921-7.) source: http://bbsnews.net/a...071124003153693 The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation Luciano De Petrocellis*,†, Dominique Melck*,‡, Antonella Palmisano§, Tiziana Bisogno‡, Chiara Laezza¶, Maurizio Bifulco¶, and Vincenzo Di Marzo‡,‖ +Author Affiliations †Istituto di Cibernetica and ‡Istituto per la Chimica di Molecole di Interesse Biologico (affiliated with the National Institute for the Chemistry of Biological Systems, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Toiano 6, 80072 Arco Felice, Naples, Italy; § Istituto di Ricerche sull’Adattamento dei Bovini e dei Bufali all’Ambiente del Mezzogiorno, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Ponticelli, 80147 Naples, Italy; and ¶Centro di Studio der l’Endocrinologia e l’Oncologia Sperimentale, Consiglio Nazionale Delle Richerche and Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, Università di Napoli ‘Federico II,’ 80131 Naples, Italy Communicated by Rita Levi-Montalcini, Institute of Neurobiology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome, Italy (received for review March 6, 1998) Abstract Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide ®-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. source: http://www.pnas.org/...4/8375.abstract Suppression of Nerve Growth Factor Trk Receptors and Prolactin Receptors by Endocannabinoids Leads to Inhibition of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation1 Dominique Melck, Luciano De Petrocellis, Pierangelo Orlando, Tiziana Bisogno, Chiara Laezza, Maurizio Bifulco and Vincenzo Di Marzo Istituto per la Chimica di Molecole di Interesse Biologico (D.M., T.B., V.D.M.), Istituto di Cibernetica (L.D.P.), and Istituto di Biochimica delle Proteine ed Enzimologia (P.O.), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 80072 Arco Felice (NA); and Centro di Endocrinologia e Oncologia Sperimentale, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, and Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, Università di Napoli Federico II (C.L., M.B.), 80131 Naples, Italy Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Dr. Vincenzo Di Marzo, Istituto per la Chimica di Molecole di Interesse Biologico, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 80072 Arco Felice (NA), Italy. E-mail: vdm@trinc.icmib.na.cnr.it. Anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), two endogenous ligands of the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor subtypes, inhibit the proliferation of PRL-responsive human breast cancer cells (HBCCs) through down-regulation of the long form of the PRL receptor (PRLr). Here we report that 1) anandamide and 2-AG inhibit the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced proliferation of HBCCs through suppression of the levels of NGF Trk receptors; 2) inhibition of PRLr levels results in inhibition of the proliferation of other PRL-responsive cells, the prostate cancer DU-145 cell line; and 3) CB1-like cannabinoid receptors are expressed in HBCCs and DU-145 cells and mediate the inhibition of cell proliferation and Trk/PRLr expression. ß-NGF-induced HBCC proliferation was potently inhibited (IC50 = 50–600 nM) by the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210, 2-AG, anandamide, and its metabolically stable analogs, but not by the anandamide congener, palmitoylethanolamide, or the selective agonist of CB2 cannabinoid receptors, BML-190. The effect of anandamide was blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist, SR141716A, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist, SR144528. Anandamide and HU-210 exerted a strong inhibition of the levels of NGF Trk receptors as detected by Western immunoblotting; this effect was reversed by SR141716A. When induced by exogenous PRL, the proliferation of prostate DU-145 cells was potently inhibited (IC50 = 100–300 nM) by anandamide, 2-AG, and HU-210. Anandamide also down-regulated the levels of PRLr in DU-145 cells. SR141716A attenuated these two effects of anandamide. HBCCs and DU-145 cells were shown to contain 1) transcripts for CB1 and, to a lesser extent, CB2 cannabinoid receptors, 2) specific binding sites for [3H]SR141716A that could be displaced by anandamide, and 3) a CB1 receptor-immunoreactive protein. These findings suggest that endogenous cannabinoids and CB1 receptor agonists are potential negative effectors of PRL- and NGF-induced biological responses, at least in some cancer cells. source: http://endo.endojour...tract/141/1/118 CHEMOTHERAPY, ANTIBIOTICS, AND GENE THERAPY Antitumor Activity of Plant Cannabinoids with Emphasis on the Effect of Cannabidiol on Human Breast Carcinoma Alessia Ligresti, Aniello Schiano Moriello, Katarzyna Starowicz, Isabel Matias, Simona Pisanti, Luciano De Petrocellis, Chiara Laezza, Giuseppe Portella, Maurizio Bifulco, and Vincenzo Di Marzo Endocannabinoid Research Group, Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare (A.L., A.S.M., K.S., I.M., V.D.M.), and Istituto di Cibernetica (A.S.M., L.D.P.), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Pozzuoli, Italy; Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare "L. Califano", Università di Napoli "Federico II", Napoli, Italy (S.P., C.L., G.P., M.B.); and Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Salerno, Fisciano, Italy (S.P., M.B.) 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exhibits antitumor effects on various cancer cell types, but its use in chemotherapy is limited by its psychotropic activity. We investigated the antitumor activities of other plant cannabinoids, i.e., cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, cannabidiol acid and THC acid, and assessed whether there is any advantage in using Cannabis extracts (enriched in either cannabidiol or THC) over pure cannabinoids. Results obtained in a panel of tumor cell lines clearly indicate that, of the five natural compounds tested, cannabidiol is the most potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth (IC50 between 6.0 and 10.6 µM), with significantly lower potency in noncancer cells. The cannabidiol-rich extract was equipotent to cannabidiol, whereas cannabigerol and cannabichromene followed in the rank of potency. Both cannabidiol and the cannabidiol-rich extract inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors obtained by s.c. injection into athymic mice of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma or rat v-K-ras-transformed thyroid epithelial cells and reduced lung metastases deriving from intrapaw injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Judging from several experiments on its possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of action, we propose that cannabidiol lacks a unique mode of action in the cell lines investigated. At least for MDA-MB-231 cells, however, our experiments indicate that cannabidiol effect is due to its capability of inducing apoptosis via: direct or indirect activation of cannabinoid CB2 and vanilloid transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 receptors and cannabinoid/vanilloid receptor-independent elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species. Our data support the further testing of cannabidiol and cannabidiol-rich extracts for the potential treatment of cancer source: http://jpet.aspetjou...ract/318/3/1375 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Inhibits Cell Cycle Progression in Human Breast Cancer Cells through Cdc2 Regulation María M. Caffarel1, David Sarrió2, José Palacios2, Manuel Guzmán1 and Cristina Sánchez1 1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, School of Biology, Complutense University and 2 Breast and Gynecological Cancer Group, Molecular Pathology Programme, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas, Madrid, Spain Requests for reprints: Cristina Sánchez, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, School of Biology, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Phone: 34-913944668; Fax: 34-913944672; E-mail: csg@bbm1.ucm.es. It has been proposed that cannabinoids are involved in the control of cell fate. Thus, these compounds can modulate proliferation, differentiation, and survival in different manners depending on the cell type and its physiopathologic context. However, little is known about the effect of cannabinoids on the cell cycle, the main process controlling cell fate. Here, we show that 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), through activation of CB2 cannabinoid receptors, reduces human breast cancer cell proliferation by blocking the progression of the cell cycle and by inducing apoptosis. In particular, THC arrests cells in G2-M via down-regulation of Cdc2, as suggested by the decreased sensitivity to THC acquired by Cdc2-overexpressing cells. Of interest, the proliferation pattern of normal human mammary epithelial cells was much less affected by THC. We also analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR the expression of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in a series of human breast tumor and nontumor samples. We found a correlation between CB2 expression and histologic grade of the tumors. There was also an association between CB2 expression and other markers of prognostic and predictive value, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and ERBB2/HER-2 oncogene. Importantly, no significant CB2 expression was detected in nontumor breast tissue. Taken together, these data might set the bases for a cannabinoid therapy for the management of breast cancer.(Cancer Res 2006; 66(13): 6615-21) source: http://cancerres.aac...ract/66/13/6615 Science: A combination of THC and prochlorperazine effective in reducing nausea and vomiting in women following breast surgery Researchers of the University of Arkansas and the Central Arkansas Veterans Hospital System investigated the effects of 5 mg oral THC and 25 mg rectal prochlorperazine on the rate of nausea and vomiting in women following breast surgery under general anaesthesia. The rate of nausea decreased from 59 per cent to 15 per cent and the rate of vomiting from 29 per cent to 3 per cent compared to non-treated patients. A retrospective review of 242 eligible patients, who underwent surgery between July 2001 and March 2003 was performed. 127 patients received surgery before September 2002 and did not receive a prophylaxis. 115 patients received surgery after September 2002 and were treated before surgery with oral THC (dronabinol) and rectal prochlorperazine. Data were collected from hospital records. Researchers concluded that post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a "significant problem in breast surgical patients. Preoperative treatment with dronabinol and prochlorperazine significantly reduced the number and severity of episodes of PONV." source: http://www.cannabis-...el.php?id=219#1 Science: Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer in animal studies Italian researchers investigated the anti-tumour effects of five natural cannabinoids of the cannabis plant (cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, cannabidiol-acid and THC-acid) in breast cancer. Cannabidiol (CBD) was the most potent cannabinoid in inhibiting the growth of human breast cancer cells that had been injected under the skin of mice. CBD also reduced lung metastases deriving from human breast cancer cells that had been injected into the paws of the animals. Researchers found that the anti-tumour effects of CBD were caused by induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death). They concluded that their data "support the further testing of cannabidiol and cannabidiol-rich extracts for the potential treatment of cancer." These observations are supported by investigations of US scientists who found out that exposure of leukaemia cells to CBD led to a reduction in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. In living animals CBD caused a reduction in number of leukaemia cells. The scientists noted that CBD "may be a novel and highly selective treatment for leukemia." source: http://www.cannabis-...el.php?id=220#2 Science: A combination of THC and prochlorperazine effective in reducing nausea and vomiting in women following breast surgery Researchers of the University of Arkansas and the Central Arkansas Veterans Hospital System investigated the effects of 5 mg oral THC and 25 mg rectal prochlorperazine on the rate of nausea and vomiting in women following breast surgery under general anaesthesia. The rate of nausea decreased from 59 per cent to 15 per cent and the rate of vomiting from 29 per cent to 3 per cent compared to non-treated patients. A retrospective review of 242 eligible patients, who underwent surgery between July 2001 and March 2003 was performed. 127 patients received surgery before September 2002 and did not receive a prophylaxis. 115 patients received surgery after September 2002 and were treated before surgery with oral THC (dronabinol) and rectal prochlorperazine. Data were collected from hospital records. Researchers concluded that post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a "significant problem in breast surgical patients. Preoperative treatment with dronabinol and prochlorperazine significantly reduced the number and severity of episodes of PONV." source: http://www.cannabis-...el.php?id=219#1 “Medical Marijuana” Takes On New Meaning for Metastatic Breast Cancer If you have breast cancer, you may have considered the use of “medical marijuana” at some point during your chemo treatment. Smoking marijuana has provided some women with relief from the nausea and vomiting that can accompany chemo, relief that the range of normal side effect drugs weren’t able to give. Some states permit the legal use of medical marijuana; most don’t. Nevertheless, most women who want to try marijuana seem to be able to get it. Personally, I didn’t experience any severe problems with nausea. But I was astounded at the number of people who, prior to treatment, offered to get me a supply if I thought I needed it! Now, doctors at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute in San Francisco have released a study, in the current issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, that may in the future open the door to a much more critical use of marijuana: stopping the spread of metastatic breast cancer. It seems that a compound found in cannabis (the scientific name for marijuana), CBD, has been shown (in the lab) to stop the human gene Id-1 from directing cancer cells to multiply and spread. California Pacific Senior researcher Pierre-Yves Desprez, in an interview with HealthDay News, noted that the Id-1 genes “are very bad. They push the cells to behave like embryonic cells and grow. They go crazy, they proliferate, they migrate. We need to be able to turn them off." Desprez and fellow researcher Sean D. McAllister joined forces just two years ago. Desprez had been studying the Id-1 gene for 12 years; McAllister was a cannabis expert, but not involved in cancer research. Together they found that Id-1 is the “orchestra conductor” that directs breast cancer cells to grow and spread. And that CBD inhibits Id-1; it turns it off, puts it to sleep, pick your metaphor. Bottom line, it neutralizes it. And the cancer stops spreading. Both researchers pointed out that CBD is non-toxic and non-psychoactive. In other words, patients wouldn’t get high taking it. And its non-toxicity is an important attribute; Desprez and McAllister predict that, to be effective, patients might have to take CBD for several years. They also cautioned that smoking marijuana isn’t going to cure metastatic breast cancer; the level of CBD necessary to inhibit Id-1 simply can’t be obtained that way. While studies are still very much in the preliminary stages, it’s interesting to think that a plant that has been used medicinally for nearly 5,000 years may in the future be a key element in controlling cancer. As recently as 1937 (when it was outlawed in the U.S.), marijuana (“cannabis sativa”) was being touted as an analgesic, anti-emetic, narcotic, and sedative. Parke-Davis, once America’s oldest and largest drug manufacturer (and now a division of drug giant Pfizer), offered “Fluid Extract Cannabis” via catalogs. Until the invention of aspirin in the mid-1800s, cannabis was the civilized world’s main pain reliever. Now it’s illegal. Here’s hoping that someday soon cannabis returns, this time as a successful treatment for metastatic breast cancer. source: http://www.healthcen...6/takes-cancer/ Marijuana Compound May Stop Breast Cancer From Spreading, Study Says A compound found in cannabis may stop breast cancer from spreading throughout the body, according to a new study by scientists at California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute. The researchers are hopeful that the compound called CBD, which is found in cannabis sativa, could be a non-toxic alternative to chemotherapy. "Right now we have a limited range of options in treating aggressive forms of cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Sean D. McAllister, a cancer researcher at CPMCRI, in a news release. "Those treatments, such as chemotherapy, can be effective but they can also be extremely toxic and difficult for patients. This compound offers the hope of a non-toxic therapy that could achieve the same results without any of the painful side effects." The researchers tested CBD to inhibit the activity of a gene called Id-1, which is believed to be responsible for the aggressive spread of cancer cells throughout the body, away from the original tumor site. "We know that Id-1 is a key regulator of the spread of breast cancer," said Dr. Pierre-Yves Desprez, a cancer researcher at CPMCRI and the senior author of the study, in a news release. "We also know that Id-1 has also been found at higher levels in other forms of cancer. So what is exciting about this study is that if CBD can inhibit Id-1 in breast cancer cells, then it may also prove effective at stopping the spread of cancer cells in other forms of the disease, such as colon and brain or prostate cancer." Comparing it with another ingredient isolated from marijuana called THC, which is used in some medical treatments, the researchers said CBD does not have any psychoactive properties, so using it would not violate any state or federal laws. However, the researchers stressed that they are not suggesting that breast cancer patients smoke marijuana. They say it is highly unlikely that effective concentrations of CBD could be reached by smoking pot. The study is published in the latest issue of the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. source: http://www.foxnews.c...,312132,00.html Sean D. McAllister, PhD Introduction Our research team is studying the potential of the endocannabinoid system to control cell fate with the goal of developing therapeutic interventions for aggressive cancers. This newly discovered biological system can be regulated by many different classes of cannabinoid compounds that work through specific cellular receptors. The cloned cannabinoid receptors have been termed cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and (CB2). ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a mixed CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist, is the primary active constituent of Cannabis sativa and is currently being used in a clinical trial for the treatment of aggressive recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Cannabinoids are also being used in clinical trials for purposes unrelated to their direct anticancer activity. The compounds have been reported to be well tolerated during chronic oral and systemic administration. In addition to Δ9-THC, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabigerol (CBG) are also present in reasonable quantities in Cannabis. CBN has low affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors, whereas the non-psychotropic cannabinoids, CBD and CBG, have negligible affinity for the cloned receptors. We have determined that these additional cannabinoids are also effective and inhibiting aggressive cancers. Importantly, we have discovered in vitro that a synergistic increase in the antiproliferative and apoptotic activity of cannabinoids can be produced by combining specific ratios of CB1 and CB2 receptors agonists with non-psychotropic cannabinoids. We are currently determining the molecular mechanism that may explain the synergistic increase in anticancer activity that is observed with the combination treatments. We are also studying whether this combination strategy will lead to greater antitumor activity in vivo. In addition to the combination therapy project, we are working in collaboration with Dr. Pierre Desprez to develop novel inhibitors of Id-1 using cannabinoid compounds. Id-1 is a helix-loop-helix protein that acts as an inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that control cell differentiation, development and carcinogenesis. Past research of Id-1 expression in normal and cancerous breast cells, as well as in mouse mammary glands and in human breast cancer biopsies, demonstrated that increased Id-1 expression was associated with a proliferative and invasive phenotype. Specifically, it was found that Id-1 was constitutively expressed at a high level in aggressive breast cancer cells and human biopsies, and that aggressiveness was reverted in vitro and in vivo when Id-1 expression was targeted using antisense technology. Importantly, we have recently discovered that CBD, a nontoxic cannabinoid that lacks psychoactivity, can inhibit Id-1 gene expression in metastatic breast cancer cells and consequently their aggressive phenotype. The down-regulation of expression was the result of the inhibition of the endogenous Id-1 promoter and corresponding mRNA and protein levels. CBD and compounds based off of its structure can therefore potentially be used as therapeutic agents. CBD also inhibits breast cancer metastasis in vivo. Based off of our recent findings, we are currently involved in 1) developing novel CBD analogs for the treat of aggressive breast cancers 2) discovering the detailed mechanisms through which cannabinoid compounds regulate Id-1 expression. source: http://www.cpmc.org/...ience/sean.html McAllister SD, Christian RT, Horowitz MP, Garcia A, Desprez PY. California Pacific Medical Center, Research Institute, 475 Brannan Street, San Francisco, CA 94107, USA. mcallis@cpmcri.org Invasion and metastasis of aggressive breast cancer cells is the final and fatal step during cancer progression, and is the least understood genetically. Clinically, there are still limited therapeutic interventions for aggressive and metastatic breast cancers available. Clearly, effective and nontoxic therapies are urgently required. Id-1, an inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a key regulator of the metastatic potential of breast and additional cancers. Using a mouse model, we previously determined that metastatic breast cancer cells became significantly less invasive in vitro and less metastatic in vivo when Id-1 was down-regulated by stable transduction with antisense Id-1. It is not possible at this point, however, to use antisense technology to reduce Id-1 expression in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Here, we report that cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid with a low-toxicity profile, could down-regulate Id-1 expression in aggressive human breast cancer cells. The CBD concentrations effective at inhibiting Id-1 expression correlated with those used to inhibit the proliferative and invasive phenotype of breast cancer cells. CBD was able to inhibit Id-1 expression at the mRNA and protein level in a concentration-dependent fashion. These effects seemed to occur as the result of an inhibition of the Id-1 gene at the promoter level. Importantly, CBD did not inhibit invasiveness in cells that ectopically expressed Id-1. In conclusion, CBD represents the first nontoxic exogenous agent that can significantly decrease Id-1 expression in metastatic breast cancer cells leading to the down-regulation of tumor aggressiveness. source: http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum N. California Researchers Testing Whether Marijuana Chemical Can Slow Cancer Growth, With Funding by Susan G. Komen for the Cure® Largest Breast Cancer Organization Investing $60 Million to Research Despite Down Economy SAN FRANCISCO, April 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Testing whether a powerful ingredient in marijuana can help slow the growth of aggressive breast cancer cells is just one of six Bay Area breast cancer studies being funded this year by Susan G. Komen for the Cure®, the global leader in the breast cancer movement announced today. The projects are part of a $60 million portfolio of 2009 research grants that Komen for the Cure is investing with scientists worldwide to find the cures for breast cancer. "Breast cancer doesn't care about the economy, and with more than 1.3 million new cases of breast cancer expected this year, the need for new research is more urgent than ever," said Hala Moddelmog, Komen's CEO and president. In the Bay Area this year, Komen's $1.8 million in grants will go to the University of California at San Francisco, Stanford University School of Medicine and California Pacific Medical Center. The UCSF study will try to improve bilingual communication and education between Latinas and their health care providers. One Stanford grant, if successful, could reverse some of the debilitating neurological and cognitive side effects of brain metastases, halt the progression of disease and possibly reduce mortality. And CPMC researchers will test whether cannabidiol - an ingredient in marijuana - can inhibit the aggressive growth of some breast cancers. "Komen's infusion of millions of dollars into research projects means that promising research that is designed to treat and ultimately eradicate breast cancer will continue," said Eric Winer, M.D., Komen's chief scientific advisor. During the past 27 years, Komen has invested $400 million to fund research globally, starting with Komen's first grant in 1982 for $28,000. A decade later, the annual total had grown to 21 grants worth $590,000 and 10 years after that, Komen distributed $21 million in research funds. This year, Komen is providing researchers worldwide with $60 million. In the last three years alone, Komen has invested nearly $237 million for breast cancer research. In 2008, Komen created Promise Grants - a new category of multi-year, multi-million dollar grants designed to discover and deliver cures for breast cancer more quickly. Here is a list of local institutions, the researchers and the projects Komen is funding this year, pending agreements: University of California at San Francisco *Celia Kaplan, $450,185, Breast Cancer Risk Reduction in Primary Care Clinics: A Bilingual Intervention for Women and Physicians Stanford University School of Medicine *Irene Wapnir, $600,000, From Bench to Bedside: Treatment of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis with 131I and Radiosensitizers *Roeland Nusse, $180,000, 'Wnt signaling in human breast cancer stem cells. *Michael Clarke, $180,000, Functions of microRNAs in metastatic tumor initiating cells of human breast cancer *Howard Chang, $180,000, Noncoding RNA, Polycomb and Breast Cancer Progression California Pacific Medical Center *Sean McAlister, $593,713, Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Aggressiveness by Cannabidiol About Susan G. Komen for the Cure® Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan G. Komen, she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. In 1982, that promise became Susan G. Komen for the Cure and launched the global breast cancer movement. Today, Komen for the Cure is the world's largest grassroots network of breast cancer survivors and activists fighting to save lives, empower people, ensure quality care for all and energize science to find the cures. Thanks to events like the Komen Race for the Cure®, we have invested more than $1.3 billion to fulfill our promise, becoming the largest source of nonprofit funds dedicated to the fight against breast cancer in the world. For more information about Susan G. Komen for the Cure, breast health or breast cancer, visit www.komen.org or call 1-877 GO KOMEN. SOURCE Susan G. Komen for the Cure source: http://news.prnewswi...C...3872&EDATE= Cannabis compound 'halts cancer' The CBD compound found in cannabis is non-toxicA compound found in cannabis may stop breast cancer spreading throughout the body, US scientists believe.The California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute team are hopeful that cannabidiol or CBD could be a non-toxic alternative to chemotherapy. Unlike cannabis, CBD does not have any psychoactive properties so its use would not violate laws, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics reports. The authors stressed that they were not suggesting patients smoke marijuana. They added that it would be highly unlikely that effective concentrations of CBD could be reached by smoking cannabis. This compound offers the hope of a non-toxic therapy that could achieve the same results without any of the painful side effects <br clear="all"> Lead researcher Dr Sean McAllister CBD works by blocking the activity of a gene called Id-1 which is believed to be responsible for the aggressive spread of cancer cells away from the original tumour site - a process called metastasis. Past work has shown CBD can block aggressive human brain cancers. The latest work found CBD appeared to have a similar effect on breast cancer cells in the lab. Future hope Lead researcher Dr Sean McAllister said: "Right now we have a limited range of options in treating aggressive forms of cancer. "Those treatments, such as chemotherapy, can be effective but they can also be extremely toxic and difficult for patients. "This compound offers the hope of a non-toxic therapy that could achieve the same results without any of the painful side effects." Dr Joanna Owens of Cancer Research UK said: "This research is at a very early stage. "The findings will need to be followed up with clinical trials in humans to see if the CBD is safe, and whether the beneficial effects can be replicated. "Several cancer drugs based on plant chemicals are already used widely, such as vincristine - which is derived from a type of flower called Madagascar Periwinkle and is used to treat breast and lung cancer. It will be interesting to see whether CBD will join them." Maria Leadbeater of Breast Cancer Care said: "Many people experience side-effects while having chemotherapy, such as nausea and an increased risk of infection, which can take both a physical and emotional toll. "Any drug that has fewer side-effects will, of course, be of great interest." But she added: "It is clear that much more research needs to be carried out." Caution content may be shocking! WHAT IS BREAST CANCER? Breast cancer itself is a malignant tumor than can form in one or both breasts, and usually develops in the milk-producing ducts of the breast, known as the the lobules. According to the website www.Cancer.org: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, other than skin cancer. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, after lung cancer. The chance of a woman having invasive breast cancer some time during her life is a little less 1 in 8. The chance of dying from breast cancer is about 1 in 35. Now Breast Cancer isn't only found in women, it can also occur in men, although not as common, but just as deadly. The most recent statistics for 2011 from the American Cancer Society estimate as follows: About 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer in women About 57,650 new cases of carcinoma in situ (CIS) will be found (CIS is non-invasive and is the earliest form of breast cancer). About 39,520 deaths from breast cancer (women) HOW CAN YOU PREVENT IT? THE GENETIC FACTORSBecause there is a higher chance of cancer in women with a family history, women should consult a medical professional who is specifically trained in risk assessment in order to help you decide the best methods for early detection. In Western countries, up to 10% of breast cancer is attributed to genetic predisposition. It can be transmitted through either the mother or father, with the possibility of either parent transmitting the abnormality without ever developing it -- as in, they're simply carriers. However, an excess of ovarian, colon, prostatic, and other cancers are inherited in the same abnormal mutation as breast cancer, so if any of these are present in family members, it is recommended that you take precautions. Most breast cancers are due to genetic mutations, with women who get the disease at an early age predisposed to the development of breast cancer. Mentioned on www.MindFully.org: WHERE IN THE WORLD IS CANCER?
  19. LowWater

    New Guy, New Site

    Greetings, This, not counting my introductory greeting is my first post. I curate a Pinterest Site on medicinal cannabis targeted toward folks 65 and older. Don't let that disuade you from checking it out. Commentary is most welcome. It's a pleasure to be digitally surrounded by Oregonians. I'm temporarily maroooned in Central New York State - a town called Troy outside of Albany. Imagine Salem, now imagine that you drove 200 miles from where you lived to get to Salem for some weekend excitement. That's Troy. In longhand: http://www.pinterest.com/lowwater/
  20. OBESITY - Cannabis Obesity to be cured by Marijuana? A British pharmaceuticals company is planning to start trials on humans for a treatment for [tag-tec]obesity[/tag-tec] using [tag-tec]marijuana[/tag-tec]. They hasten to add that at this stage it is purely experimental. Of course marijuana has long been known to be a stimulus for hunger but GW pharma plc claim that they have derived a treatment from marijuana itself that could help suppress hunger. They go on to explain that the [tag-tec]marijuana plant[/tag-tec] has 70 different [tag-tec]cannabinoids[/tag-tec] in it and that each of these has an entirely different effect on the human body. Some stimulate your hunger whilst others suppress your hunger. GW say that they will begin trials later in 2007. All drugs have to pass a rigorous three stages of tests before it can be assessed by regulators and only then can a new drug be released. They added that this could take several years. I will keep my ear to the ground and let you know of any developments, as and when they happen. source: http://www.dreambody...d-by-marijuana/ How marijuana could help cure obesity-related diseases A British company says that two compounds found in marijuana leaves could treat patients whose weight puts them at high risk for heart disease and stroke According to a new British study, marijuana leaves (not the buds that Willie Nelson loves so dearly) contain two compounds that boost the metabolism of mice, leading to lower levels of fat and cholesterol in the body — the latest addition to a growing body of evidence that marijuana may be useful in countering ailments related to obesity. One study in March found that a brain chemical similar in structure to an active compound in cannibis could help people shed weight, while another study last September concluded that pot smokers were less likely to be obese than non-potheads, though for reasons that remain unclear. The researchers at Britain's GW Pharmaceuticals who are responsible for the latest weed development are already testing the two compounds on humans. Here, a guide to their findings: So the company is allowed to grow and dispense marijuana? Yes. Although marijuana is illegal in England, says Doug Barry at Jezebel, GW Pharmaceuticals, an "enormous multinational drug corporation equipped with all the magic passwords for dodging government regulations," was granted a license to grow the plant in specially constructed greenhouses at a secret location in the south of England. SEE MORE: Invented: Marijuana that doesn't get you high http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8WCdANlf_I London -- Human trials of an experimental treatment for obesity derived from cannabis, which is commonly associated with stimulating hunger, are scheduled to begin in the second half of this year, Britain's GW Pharmaceuticals Plc announced Tuesday. Several other companies, such as Sanofi-Aventis, which is investigating Acomplia, are working on new drugs that will switch off the brain circuits that make people hungry when they smoke cannabis. GW Pharma, however, says it has derived a treatment from cannabis that could help suppress hunger. "The cannabis plant has 70 different cannabinoids in it and each has a different affect on the body," GW Managing Director Justin Gover told Reuters in a telephone interview. "Some can stimulate your appetite, and some in the same plant can suppress your appetite. It is amazing both scientifically and commercially," he said. Drugs have to pass three stages of tests in humans before being eligible for approval by regulators in a process that takes many years. Sanofi-Aventis' Acomplia, which it believes can achieve $3 billion in annual sales, is already on sale in Europe and it is waiting for a U.S. regulatory decision in April. Several other big drug companies also already have similar products to Acomplia in clinical trials. GW is best known for developing Sativex, a treatment derived from cannabis that fights spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients. Sativex, an under-the-tongue spray, has been approved in Canada, but has hit delays with regulators in Britain. GW submitted Sativex for assessment by several European regulators in September, and hopes to secure approval for the UK, Denmark, Spain and the Netherlands in the second half of this year at the earliest, the company said on Tuesday. GW's marijuana plants are grown indoors in a secret location in Southern England. ScienceDaily (May 8, 2008) — Anti-obesity drugs that work by blocking brain molecules similar to those in marijuana could also interfere with neural development in young children, according to a new study from MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. Marijuana is known to be an appetite stimulant, and a new class of anti-obesity drugs--such as rimonabant (trade name Acomplia) developed by Sanofi-Aventis and awaiting approval for use in the United States--work by blocking brain receptors that bind to marijuana and other cannabinoids. Marijuana, derived from the plant Cannabis sativa, contains special active compounds that are referred to collectively as cannabinoids. But other cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) are generated naturally inside the body. The MIT study, which was done in mice, found that blocking cannabinoid receptors could also suppress the adaptive rewiring of the brain necessary for neural development in children. The work is reported in the May 8 issue of Neuron. "Our finding of a profound disruption of cortical plasticity in juvenile mice suggests caution is advised in the use of such compounds in children," wrote lead author Mark F. Bear, director of the Picower Institute and Picower Professor of Neuroscience. The researchers investigated plasticity--the brain's ability to change in response to experience--by temporarily depriving newborn mice of vision in one eye soon after birth. This well-known experiment induces a long-lasting loss of synapses that causes blindness in the covered eye, while synapses shift to the uncovered eye. How and where this synaptic shift occurs in the primary visual cortex has remained controversial. Understanding the mechanism behind this phenomenon is key because the same brain mechanisms are used for normal development and may go awry in conditions that cause developmental delays in humans, and may reappear in old age and contribute to synaptic loss during Alzheimer's disease, Bear said. In mice, the MIT researchers found, even one day of deprivation from one eye starts the shift to dominance of the uncovered eye. But injecting the mice with a cannabinoid receptor blocker halted the shift in certain brain regions, indicating that cannabinoids play a key role in early synaptic development. Blocking cannabinoids receptors could thwart this developmental process, the researchers said. This work is supported by the National Eye Institute and the National Institute of Mental Health. source: http://www.scienceda...80507133326.htm
  21. Hey everyone. I hope for those reading, things in your life are good and you're happy. I don't mean to be a debbie downer but I don't feel I have many people to talk to. My situation really sucks. I was mis-diagnosed many times by doctors. Ended up in the emergency room. Was in bad shape. Things happened so fast, next thing I know I'm laying on a bed being irradiated everyday along with a pump surgically placed in my chest (right next to my heart) which had a chemo bag hooked up to it slowly pumping in poison even while I slept. Now that all that's over and I'm healing up from all the damage they have already done, now they want to cut a bunch of stuff out. Important stuff. I am 30 years old. What's sad is I felt better. But now I can feel it growing back inside me. The throbbing pain is starting to get worse. My insurance is only willing to cover me for conventional treatment. Meaning cutting me all up and more chemo. I can't and won't do that. I have been scrabbling doing research. Really working hard and eating as healthy as possible but I already was like that. I think I was exposed to something while deployed. I was planning on flying out to OR and trying to get my card since OR is the only state that doesn't require you to be a state resident. The only thing is i don't know any one out there. I have money saved up and would be able to fly out there and stay for a month or two. If I end up going to OR and not being able to get my hands on high concentrated medicine and spending what I had for the trip, lodging +medicine cost, not only would it take all my savings, it would take whatever hope I had left and possibly my life. The only hope I have now is finding some way to get this medicine and not ruining my life or dying in the process. But I guess my life is pretty much ruined. I don't have options. No good options at least. I wish we lived in a better world. A world where we weren't being systematically wiped out, just slowly and painfully so "they" can make money off it. I just can't believe something so amazing like cannabis can be illegal while on every corner in America there is a fast food place or quickie mart selling gmo artificial poison legally. That should make everyone want to scream this is not right! A plant that would help me I can't get. And I shouldn't have to be even doing this. We live in the year 2013. I shouldn't nor anyone be in this position. Spending hours online searching and reading. All your research leads you to oil. Even the National Cancer Institute's own research shows nothing but beneficial activity in the cannabinoid system, anti-inflammatory properties, anti-tumor properties and so much more. It truely is an alien plant to me. Nothing else like it anywhere. But it's just not right that because I am from a certain state or country, I can't have access to the medicine I need, medicine that would help. I have to use everything I have to go across the country and it's not even a guarantee I can get it. It's hard to have any hope after getting all this out. I'm afraid it's going to spread...... I'm a good person. I didn't deserve this, and neither does anyone else. Sorry for my vent. I hope I didn't ruin anybody's night. If anyone could help I would forever be in your debt. This just wasn't the plan.. Thanks for reading..
  22. Sup, this is a video on how to make Green Dragon tincture, some easy way to make good use of your trim. Very potent and long lasting stuff, hope you enjoy! Dont forget to subscribe and thumbs up! From Master Wu himself: "Process details—references and rationalizations: 1. Chop the cannabis More surface area gives means a faster and more efficient extraction. 2. Bake the cannabis. This converts THCA to THC via a decarboxylation reaction. In whole-plant cannabis, THC content is expressed as THCA (tetrahydrocannabolic acid) prior to decarboxylation into THC, which takes place when cannabis is heated during cooking, and smoked or vaporized ingestion. THCA is a mild analgesic and anti-inflammatory but does not have good affinity with our CB1 receptors, so in order to make a THC-rich tincture that has many of the same therapeutic effects as smoked ingestion (including rapid absorption, quick relief and ease of self-titration), we must convert the THCA in the plant matter into THC prior to extracting it through an alcohol soak. (from Vancouver Island Compassion Society http://thevics.com/cannamist.htm) THC vaporizes at about 380°F. We want to heat the cannabis to convert THCA to THC, but keep the temperature under 380°F. That is why 325°F is used. Between four and five minutes your oven (and house) will start to smell very strong. This is the time to remove the cannabis from the oven. Notice also that there is considerable misinformation regarding heating the cannabis. It is true that you don't have to heat it to extract both THC and THCA, but the amount of THC in whole plant preparations is relatively small compared to after decarboxylation of the THCA. So if you want to maximize the strength of your tincture you must heat the cannabis prior to extraction. 3. Use the highest proof alcohol available. Where I live this is Bacardi 151. The more alcohol the more efficient the extraction will be. 4. Simmer the mixture. This is one of the areas that seems to be most debated. Many recipes call for placing the cannabis (unbaked of course) into the alcohol and waiting 2 -- 6 weeks. The main concern with heating the alcohol is that it is "explosive" (not exactly true...it is however flammable). The purpose of the simmering is to heat the alcohol mixture to improve extraction rates and efficiencies. Heating during extraction increases the motion of the molecules (basic physics/chemistry) and drastically decreases extraction times. The boiling point of pure ethanol is 173°F (78°C). We will use the water bath to heat the rum/cannabis mixture to just below the boiling point of ethanol. Heating the alcohol mixture can be done very safely using a hot water bath. You will need an accurate candy or quick read thermometer. Place about 1 inch of water in a wide, vertical-edged pan (9" diameter x 3" high). Bring the water to a low simmer. The rum/cannabis mixture should be in a small (1 pint) mason jar. Do NOT cover the jar. Put the thermometer into the mason jar and place into the simmering water bath. Bring the temperature of the rum/cannabis mixture to about 170°F. The alcohol should be just barely boiling. You should have the oven fan on high. You will notice that any alcohol fumes are mixed with water vapor from the water bath and vented out the fan. This combined with the fact that you are trying not to boil the ethanol makes the process quite safe. 5. Strain and store. When you are finished with the extraction you will be left with about 1oz of green dragon tincture after you have strained the extract. Notice that one ounce of the alcohol has evaporated. See the tips below for a good way to strain the tincture. A standard eyedropper will transfer about 1ml (or 1 gram) of liquid. There are 29 milliliters in one ounce. So you should end up with about 30 or so full eyedroppers (30 milliliters) of Green Dragon. The liquid should be dark brownish-green and smell like cannabis. 6. Dosage. Titration. Everybody is different. It takes me between 30-90 minutes to feel the effects of Green Dragon (depending on how much food is in my stomach). I had tried a tincture someone had made using the cold extraction method with the same amount of cannabis and found that 5 ml (5 full eyedroppers) did pretty much nothing. Using my Green Dragon technique I find that one dropper will bring effects on in 30-90 minutes and last 5 hours with 1.5 hours of lingering aftereffects. Two droppers gave me a "spiritual dose" (as strong as any brownie I ever had). Effects lasted 7-8 hours with lingering effects for 2 more hours. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLsyYxGBFgw Source: How To Make Green Dragon Tincture (Cannabis Tinctu
  23. Lymphoblasts are immature cells which typically differentiate to form mature lymphocytes. Normally lymphoblasts are found in the bone marrow only, but in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), lymphoblasts proliferate uncontrollably and are found in large numbers in the peripheral blood smear. July 14th 2012 (diagnosis day and steroid treatment began) Mykayla’s Lymphoblast percentage in her blood smear was 33% July 15th 2012 - 51% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear July 16th 2012 – 11% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear (began chemotherapy) July 17th 2012 – 14% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear July 18th 2012 – 16% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear July 19th 2012 – 3% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear July 20th 2012 – 29% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear (got released from hospital) July 23rd 2012 – 31% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear July 24th 2012 – BEGAN CANNABIS OIL (RICK SIMPSON OIL, WHOLE EXTRACT CANNABIS OIL) July 26th 2012 – 5% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood smear July 30th 2012 – 3% Lymphoblasts in Mykayla’s blood (doctor spoke to us about Mykayla’s Lymphoblast count failing to go down to 0 and said that a Bone Marrow Transplant MAY BE in our near future because her blasts are not gone from her blood. August 2nd 2012 – 0% blasts August 6th 2012 – 0% blasts August 13th 2012 – 0% blasts August 20th 2012 – 0% blasts TODAY – 0% blasts! July 30th 2012 was THE VERY LAST TIME THEY HAVE FOUND LYMPHOBLASTS IN MYKAYLA’S BLOOD SMEAR!!!! The very next time we saw the oncologist they told us Mykayla was in remission. Some may say that cannabis does not “cure” cancer… I am not saying the steroids and chemo didn’t help… but this right here shows something… proof enough for me! Some say cannabis is inappropriate for children… We Say cancer is inappropriate for children. <3 PeaceloveCURE
  24. Killing bacteria with cannabis Pharmacists and chemists have found another use for the multipurpose cannabis as a source of antibacterial chemicals for multidrug resistant bacteria. Ironically, inhaling cannabis is known to damage the lung's ability to fend off invading pathogens, but the ingredients in cannabis, particularly the cannabinoids, have antiseptic properties. Although scattered research has been conducted since the 1950s, no comprehensive study existed that relates the structure of cannabinoids with antibacterial activity. Giovanni Appendino, Simon Gibbons, and coworkers attempted to remedy that problem by examining the activity of five common cannabinoids and their synthetic derivatives. Five of the most common cannabinoids. All five cannabinoids (THC, CBD, CBG, CBC, and CBN) were potent against bacteria. Notably, they performed well against bacteria that were known to be multidrug resistant, like the strains of MRSA that plagued U.K. hospitals. CBD and CBG have the most potential for consumer use because they are nonpsychotropic. Besides identifying antibacterial capability, the researchers wanted to figure out why these cannabinoids are so good at killing bacteria. They obviously are very effective at specifically targeting some vital process in the bacteria. Unfortunately, even after extensive work at modifying the cannabinoids and comparing their activities, that targeting mechanism remains a mystery. The scientists were able to figure out that the position of the n-pentyl chain (orange) relative to the terpenoid moiety (blue) serves to control lipid affinity. These cannabinoids are promising enough to warrant rigorous clinical trials. They are applicable as topical antiseptics, biodegradable antibacterial compounds for cosmetics, and systematic antibacterial agents. J. Nat. Prod., 2008. DOI: 10.1021/np8002673 Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has long been known to contain antibacterial cannabinoids, whose potential to address antibiotic resistance has not yet been investigated. All five major cannabinoids (cannabidiol (1b), cannabichromene (2), cannabigerol (3b), Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (4b), and cannabinol (5)) showed potent activity against a variety of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains of current clinical relevance. Activity was remarkably tolerant to the nature of the prenyl moiety, to its relative position compared to the n-pentyl moiety (abnormal cannabinoids), and to carboxylation of the resorcinyl moiety (pre-cannabinoids). Conversely, methylation and acetylation of the phenolic hydroxyls, esterification of the carboxylic group of pre-cannabinoids, and introduction of a second prenyl moiety were all detrimental for antibacterial activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that the prenyl moiety of cannabinoids serves mainly as a modulator of lipid affinity for the olivetol core, a per se poorly active antibacterial pharmacophore, while their high potency definitely suggests a specific, but yet elusive, mechanism of activity. Several studies have associated the abuse of marijuana (Cannabis sativa L. Cannabinaceae) with an increase in opportunistic infections,(1) and inhalation of marijuana has indeed been shown to interfere with the production of nitric oxide from pulmonary macrophages, impairing the respiratory defense mechanisms against pathogens and causing immunosuppression.(2) The association of C. sativa with a decreased protection against bacterial infections is paradoxical, since this plant has long been known to contain powerful antibacterial agents.(3) Thus, preparations from C. sativa were investigated extensively in the 1950s as highly active topical antiseptic agents for the oral cavity and the skin and as antitubercular agents.(3) Unfortunately, most of these investigations were done at a time when the phytochemistry of Cannabis was still in its infancy, and the remarkable antibacterial profile of the plant could not be related to any single, structurally defined and specific constituent. Evidence that pre-cannabidiol (1a) is a powerful plant antibiotic was, nevertheless, obtained,(4) and more recent investigations have demonstrated, to various degrees, antibacterial activity for the nonpsychotropic cannabinoids cannabichromene (CBC, 2),(5) cannabigerol (CBG, 3b),(6) and cannabidiol (1b),(7) as well as for the psychotropic agent Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 4b).(7) These observations, and the inactivity of several noncannabinoid constituents of C. sativa as antibacterial agents, suggest that cannabinoids and their precursors are the most likely antibacterial agents present in C. sativa preparations.(8) However, differences in bacterial strains and end-points make it difficult to compare the data reported in these scattered studies, and the overall value of C. sativa as an antibacterial agent is therefore not easy to assess. There are currently considerable challenges with the treatment of infections caused by strains of clinically relevant bacteria that show multidrug-resistance (MDR), such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the recently emerged and extremely drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis XDR-TB. New antibacterials are therefore urgently needed, but only one new class of antibacterial has been introduced in the last 30 years.(9) Despite the excellent antibacterial activity of many plant secondary metabolites(10) and the ability of some of them to modify the resistance associated with MDR strains(11) and efflux pumps,(12) plants are still a substantially untapped source of antimicrobial agents. These considerations, as well as the observation that cross-resistance to microbial and plant antibacterial agents is rare,(10) make C. sativa a potential source of compounds to address antibiotic resistance, one of the most urgent issues in antimicrobial therapy. To obtain structure−activity data and define a possible microbiocidal cannabinoid pharmacophore, we investigated the antibacterial profile of the five major cannabinoids, of their alkylation and acylation products, and of a selection of their carboxylic precursors (pre-cannabinoids) and synthetic positional isomers (abnormal cannabinoids). Results and Discussion The antibacterial cannabinoid chemotype is poorly defined, as is the molecular mechanism of its activity. Since many simple phenols show antimicrobial properties, it does not seem unreasonable to assume that the resorcinol moiety of cannabinoids serves as the antibacterial pharmacophore, with the alkyl, terpenoid, and carboxylic appendices modulating its activity. To gain insight into the microbiocidal cannabinoid pharmacophore, we have investigated how the nature of the terpenoid moiety, its relative position compared to the n-pentyl group, and the effect of carboxylation of the resorcinyl moiety are translated biologically, assaying the major cannabinoids and a selection of their precursors and regioisomeric analogues against drug-resistant bacteria of clinical relevance. Within these, we have selected a panel of clinically relevant Staphylococcus aureus strains that includes the (in)famous EMRSA-15, one of the main epidemic methicillin-resistant strains,(13) and SA-1199B, a multidrug-resistant strain that overexpresses the NorA efflux mechanism, the best characterized antibiotic efflux pump in this species.(14) SA-1199B also possesses a gyrase mutation that, in addition to NorA, confers a high level of resistance to certain fluoroquinolones. A macrolide-resistant strain (RN4220),(15) a tetracycline-resistant line overexpressing the TetK efflux pump (XU212),(16) and a standard laboratory strain (ATCC25923) completed the bacterial panel. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 4b), cannabidiol (CBD, 1b), cannabigerol (CBG, 3b), cannabichromene (CBC, 2), and cannabinol (CBN, 5) are the five most common cannabinoids.(17) They could be obtained in high purity (>98%) by isolation from strains of C. sativa producing a single major cannabinoid (THC, CBD, CBG), by total synthesis (CBC),(6) or by semisynthesis (CBN).(18) Their antimicrobial properties are listed in Table 1. All compounds showed potent antibacterial activity, with MIC values in the 0.5−2 μg/mL range. Activity was exceptional against some of these strains, in particular the multidrug-resistant (MDR) SA-1199B, which has a high level of resistance to certain fluoroquinolones. Also noteworthy is the potent activity demonstrated against EMRSA-15 and EMRSA-16, the major epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains occurring in U.K. hospitals.(13, 19) These activities compare highly favorably with the standard antibiotics for these strains. The potent activity against strains possessing the NorA and TetK efflux transporters suggests that cannabinoids are not substrates for the most common resistance mechanisms to current antibacterial agents, making them attractive antibacterial leads. Table 1. MIC (μg/mL) Values of Cannabinoids and Their Analogues toward Various Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureusab compoundSA-1199BRN-4220XU212ATCC25923EMRSA-15EMRSA-161a2222221b1110.51122212223a4244243b1111213f64c64ccc4a8484844b211120.5511111c61111117210.512c8323216161632106464641286464norfloxacin321410.5128erythromycin0.2564>1280.25>128>128tetracycline0.250.251280.250.1250.125oxacillin0.250.251280.12532>128 a Compounds 1c−g, 3c−e, 3g, and 9 exhibited MIC values of >128 μg/mL for all organisms in which they were evaluated. b Compound 11 exhibited MIC values of >256 μg/mL for all organisms in which they were evaluated. c Not tested. Given their nonpsychotropic profiles, CBD (1b) and CBG (3b) seemed especially promising, and were selected for further structure−activity studies. Thus, acetylation and methylation of their phenolic hydroxyls (compounds 1c−e and 3c−e, respectively) were both detrimental for activity (MIC >100 μg/mL), in accordance with the essential role of the phenolic hydroxyls in the antibacterial properties. However, in light of the potent activity of the monophenols CBC (2), THC (4b), and CBN (5), it was surprising that monomethylation of the diphenols CBD (1b) and CBG (3b) was so poorly tolerated in terms of antibacterial activity. Cannabinoids are the products of thermal degradation of their corresponding carboxylic acids (pre-cannabinoids).(17) Investigation of the antibacterial profile of the carboxylated versions of CBD, CBG, and THC (compounds 1a, 3a, and 4a, respectively) showed a substantial maintenance of activity. On the other hand, methylation of the carboxylic group (compounds 1f and 3f, respectively) caused a marked decrease of potency, as did esterification with phenethyl alcohol (compounds 1g and 3g, respectively). This operation is associated with a potentiation of the antibacterial properties of phenolic acids, as exemplified by phenethyl caffeate (CAPE), the major antibacterial from propolis, compared to caffeic acid.(20) Remarkably, the synthetic abnormal cannabinoids abn-CBD (6)(21) and abn-CBG (7)(22) showed antibacterial activity comparable to, although slightly less potent than, their corresponding natural products, while olivetol (10) showed modest activity against all six strains, with MICs of 64−128 μg/mL, and resorcinol (11) did not exhibit any activity even at 256 μg/mL. Thus, the pentyl chain and the monoterpene moiety greatly enhance the activity of resorcinol. Taken together, these observations show that the cannabinoid antibacterial chemotype is remarkably tolerant to structural modification of the terpenoid moiety and its positional relationship with the n-pentyl chain, suggesting that these residues serve mainly as modulators of lipid affinity, and therefore cellular bioavailability. This view was substantiated by the marked decrease of activity observed when the antibacterial activity of CBG (3b) was compared to that of its polar analogue carmagerol (8).(23) The results against the resistant strains confirm this suggestion, and it is likely that the increased hydrophilicity caused by the addition of two hydroxyls greatly reduces the cellular bioavailability by substantially reducing membrane permeability. 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