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#41 Holistic Organics

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:52 PM

Be sure and follow the instructions to the letter and apply when its warm in the room and stomata are open. FOLIAR ONLY NO MIXING WITH ANYTHING.



#42 Holistic Organics

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:00 AM

Lets talk about Brix readings for a min. Here are some links and PDFs on the subject. I working Brix meter is relativley cheap depending on how fancy you want to get. You can pay 12$-1500$ for a meter. The thing is even the cheap ones work well. I normally go for fancy digital meters but for the brix I started off with a cheap 25$ one from amazon. Gives me a look at the nutrient density of my plants. If they are lacking in overall nutrients the reading will be low.

 

 

http://www.crossroads.ws/brix/index-page2.html

THE BRIX STORY
THE ORIGIN OF THE WORD BRIX
Professor A. F. W. Brix was a 19th Century German chemist. He was the first to measure the density of plant juices by floating a hydrometer in them.

•BRIX is a measure of the percent solids (TSS) in a given weight of plant juice.

•BRIX is often expressed another way: BRIX equals the pounds of sucrose, fructose, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, proteins, and other solids in one hundred pounds of a particular plant juice.

•BRIX varies directly with plant QUALITY. For instance, a poor, sour tasting grape from worn out land can test 8 or less BRIX. A full flavored, delicious grape, grown on rich, fertile soil can test 24 or better BRIX. Similarly, the tasteless, almost bitter cantaloupe from the salad bar cannot be compared to the 18 Brix delight coming from the well-tended garden. All fruits & vegetables are subject to the same laws.

Please remember that sugar is only one of the components of Brix. Also understand that many substances can give “false” Brix readings. For instance, try rubbing alcohol, whiskey, vinegar, or wine. Cooking oil, molasses, syrup, and other thick liquids require a refractometer calibrated to read 30-90 Brix. Honey is checked with a refractometer calibrated to measure the water within it instead of the solids in the water. NO---a thousand times no---Brix is not sugar! You can prove it to yourself by, say, putting a teaspoon of sugar in some ordinary orange juice. It will NOT taste better.

 

43.gif

 

Brix Questions and Answers

http://crossroads.ws/Q&A/BrixQ&A1.htm

 

How to grow superb biological produce above & beyond ordinary chemical OR organic agriculture

http://www.crossroads.ws/CRActive/PikeAg.htm

OK, if you've read the Brix pages you're now aware of the true nature of quality in terms of fruits & vegetables. Typically, the next question is "How can I grow produce to better standards?" My research found many ways. One of the most simple is to apply liberal amounts of top-quality compost to one's "patch." That, of course, implies one can produce "top-quality" compost. As you'll soon see, almost all compost has to be doctored to improve its inherent quality.
Why would not just any old compost be top-quality? A little thought reveals several answers. One is that if you're using compost made from ordinary low-quality plants and garden waste, the end product will be low-quality. Another thought is that if you're using low-quality manure then you can, at best, expect low-quality compost.
"Low-quality" manure? Yes! All manure is by its very nature low-quality. How could it be otherwise? If it came from an animal---any animal---then that animal's digestive system had to have mined out all, or most, of the elements needed to maintain the animal's health. The manure, then, is nothing but unusable waste. That is not to say that plants don't appear to thrive on ordinary manure. They will grow lush and green on manure. But the growth is low Brix and low Brix is low quality. That is what excess nitrogen does to plants. However, our goal is to grow higher quality plants, not just more of the low quality junk that so dominates modern agriculture.
Perhaps an old farmer saying can help here: "You can't put 10 Brix alfalfa in one end of a cow and expect to get 20 Brix milk out the other."

 

Over a hundred years ago, Julius Hensel, a German chemist, who also owned a grist mill, discovered that the dust from ground up stones had the ability to vastly improve the quality of plants. His book, Bread From Stones, has been reprinted and is serving as a major inspiration for modern farmers who want to look beyond the simplistic nature of chemical agriculture, along with its attendant soil destruction.
Hensel's discovery was carried forward in the 1970s by John Hamaker, a retired engineer, who made healthy agriculture his second career. Hamaker's prescription for worn out, dry, failing soil is simple in the extreme: gravel dust will do the job. Hamaker's book, The Survival of Civilization carefully documents the astounding inprovements in quality AND quantity that are possible in fully remineralized agricultural soils.
Yes, although there are other methods, one answer for larger scale agricultural operations is to remineralize, i.e, to spread ground rock on the fields (or add it to their compost) so as to improve next year's crops. Given time, this is also the ideal way to improve the quality of garden output. However, time is not always available. Most people who first start using a refractometer to measure Brix are astounded---exasperated---to realize that what they thought was truly good produce is not so good after all. They want something done now!
The answer for many farmers and gardeners is to simply experiment by feeding the growing plant with various sprayed-on fertility elements. For instance, the concerned gardener may try a dilute solution of fish or seaweed (or both). If, indeed, the plant gains Brix they know they have hit on something. If the Brix remains the same---or drops---they know they must keep searching. And the search may not be as difficult as they think: manufacturers around the world are constantly developing soil & foliar applied products that can raise Brix---often dramatically.
However, let nothing said here make you think that you can take, say, a tomato plant loaded with green tomatoes and magically move them from 6 Brix to 16 Brix immediately before ripening. Your efforts will be most rewarded when you acknowledge the needs of that baby tomato seedling---and continue to do so at each of its stages. This is exactly why "Doctor" Pike (as I now teasingly call him) devotes so much effort to perfecting the tissue test methods detailed on these pages.
Dr. Carey Reams, who is given full credit for developing the Brix=Quality concept, spoke on his deathbed of the help he had received from the mentioned Bob Pike, of Pike Agri-Lab in Strong, Maine. Reams' widow even today speaks glowingly of how Reams said that his scientific testing mantle should be passed to Pike.
 

Several years back I decided to get to know Pike better and it proved a fruitful experience. In the years since Reams passed (1985), embedded computers have allowed the development of test instruments that now equip the informed crop consultant to literally carry in his pocket what once required a rather good sized laboratory.
Pike has not been idle for those years---far from it. As you will see in the pages that follow, he has refined and further developed Reams' concepts to the point that an equipped consultant can deliver real-time answers to vexing agricultural problems. However, even though the procedures are rapidly spreading among in-the-know crop consultants, Pike's modesty prevents him from claiming this is the ultimate answer. Instead, if you'll read carefully, you can almost hear him saying, "These procedures can help guide you to what you must do to create higher quality crops." By the way, if any Australian readers are here, they may want to review the Nutri-Tech webpages to see how the Reams/Pike methods are being utilized "down under." Nutri-Tech currently has over 7,000 farmers following their programs.
As you read, try to keep a thought in mind: these procedures are neither "organic" nor are they "chemical"---they are plant oriented. In other words, if the plant indicates (via a Brix gain) that it has benefited from a substance (whether that substance be "organic" or "chemical"), then that substance is what the plant needs to thrive better. There will be many times that one or more of the elements of ordinary N-P-K chemical fertilizer are exactly what the plant indicates it needs, but that in no way invalidates the need for COMPLETE fertilization.
The former fact dooms many well-meaning "organic" growers (who may ignore the plant's true needs so as to follow philosophical rules) to hopelessly flounder with low-quality crops (along with the insects & disease that such quality engenders). The latter thought, just as harmful, keeps many a mainline farmer from producing a high quality output. They'll both flounder until they learn to listen to their crops.
Rex Harrill 7/22/00

 

 

 

 

Plant Tissue Test Instructions From Pike Agri-Lab Supplies, Inc. Introduction: This method of plant sap analysis is relatively new. Sap is squeezed from the fresh plant tissue and analyzed for Brix, pH and EC. Data collected can be used as a tool in fertility management. Please note that the information contained here is preliminary. Although research continues in the area of plant sap analysis, little interpretation data is available. Over a period of time, it is recommended that a grower establish his own data, based on analysis results, fertilizer applications and crop response. Recommended tools:
•    A TC-1e    Refractometer

•   Cardy Twin pH Tester

•    Cardy Twin EC Tester

•    Infra-Red Heat Gun
•    Plant Juice Extractor (modified vise grips)

•    Carrying Case & Instructions


OVERVIEW OF CROP MANAGEMENT USING PLANT TISSUE TESTS
The following outline shows how you may be able to make improvements, based on the teachings of Carey Reams:
•    At the end of a growing season, lightly incorporate that year’s organic matter into the top layers of the soil along with a complete nutrient and microbe package.

 

•    Perform a soil test that evaluates the availability of major plant nutrients. •    Add nutrients in order to balance the major nutrients during fall or spring.

 

•    Make sure that the soil contains proper levels of air, water, and organic matter, so that the microbes can build humus to satisfy the needs of the plants.


•    Test the plant sap as soon as leaves are large enough to squeeze several drops of juice for testing. Perform the following tests to determine the needs of plants at any time during the season or at any growth-stage:

 

•    Total dissolved solids (or Brix), measured with the ATC-1e Refractometer. This number indicates the level of balance of nutrient uptake and complexing into sugars or proteins in the photosynthesis factory – the leaf. If Brix is low, even after several hours of sunshine, some element(s) are missing in the photosynthesis factory. Ions, if
present, have not been "complexed" into sugars or proteins.

 

•    pH, measured with the Cardy pH Twin Meter, indicates elements, which may be out of balance. For pH<6.4, consider if there is a need for Ca, Mg, K, or Na. For pH>6.4, consider possible need for phosphates or sulfates. If the proper elements are selected and applied, the Brix reading will increase and the pH will go to the desired

 

 

 

Are there Brix detractors?  But of course there are!  What should you expect if something so simple came along and shook YOUR toxic chemical agriculture house of cards to its very foundation. 

For instance, several years ago a California State University researcher conducted a "fair" evaluation of Brix in regards to grape leafhopper control.  His conclusion: "no difference."

Interestingly, even a high-schooler could read his paper and notice that he conducted his "tests" at 9 Brix.  He failed to mention that all Brix advocates insist you must maintain 12 Brix in the leaf to gain leaf sucking insect control.

University "research" programs have been bought, lock, stock, and barrel, by the toxic chemical industry.  Would YOU pay for a report that could cost you billions of dollars in sales?

 

 

Why get caught up in the plant disease "game"?  You could spend a lifetime studying diagnosis, pathology, and other silliness only to know as little when you ended as when you started.

Why not accept that bacterial & fungal "attacks" are nothing more than nature sending her clean-up crews to remove malnourished tissues from the scene?

It's a lot easier to learn mineral balancing and appropriate fertilizing than to memorize endless lists of "diseases" and their associated toxic chemical "cures."

The kicker in the "kill the disease" scenario is that every time the public gets wise to toxic chemical failures, something yet more destructive must be brought out from the lab with much fanfare: "this time we really do have the answer---honest."

Honest??? 

 

 



#43 Holistic Organics

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:19 AM

Tools needed:( note you will actually need a few more leaves than what is pictured.)

 

Brix_reading.jpg

 

Check calibration with distilled water to make sure it reads 0

 

Brix_reading_checking_calibration.jpg

 

 

Balled up in put into garlic press. ((note I broke the handle on this 15$ garlic press Id advise using a solid metal one or maybe some sort of modified vise grips))

 

Brix_reading_garlic_press_loaded.jpg

 

Squeeze out as few drops into a small bowl and add to the refractometer plate make sure there are no bubbles in the sample, hold up to the light, peep through. Here is the reading I got

 

Brix_reading_10_12.jpg

 

 

 

 

Growing Big Plants thread

Tom Hill :

 

"12 degrees brix is a good reading on the refractometer for cannabis."
 

 

I have heard from a good friend that he has acheived 24 on his brix readings, he claimed his plants take on a blue green hue and are lush but not like an over abundance of N lush. I have yet to attain such results. For now Im happy with my 11ish reading :P



#44 Holistic Organics

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:31 AM

Plants praying to the Creator

 

D.O.G

DOG_in_prayer.jpg

 

 

@ Day 20

day_20.jpg

 

 

Day 21, flip:

 

1st day of Flowering

 

Day_1_Flowering.jpg


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#45 PDX503Kush

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:03 PM

Interesting and involved readings H.O.! Maybe too involved.. Lol. Man.. We need to work out some sort of internship. LOL! Teach me your ways! Great work as always bro. Keep us updated. Thanks!

#46 Holistic Organics

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 10:25 AM

Interesting and involved readings H.O.! Maybe too involved.. Lol. Man.. We need to work out some sort of internship. LOL! Teach me your ways! Great work as always bro. Keep us updated. Thanks!

Too involved? Depends on your level of dedication/ passion I guess.  Cannabis is my passion. Its what I love, its what we need. The only passion I have with an equal flame outside of my family and growing food, is Fungi. IMO equally as amazing with potential to change the world as well. Internship? Nah, Im a student at the University of the Universe myself, just trying to share what Ive gathered along the way. Still a  long ways from a professor heck even a graduate.  Im still an embryo. :P



#47 usstoner

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:52 PM

Right on HO...you deff have some skills...i'm guessing your grows go out to patients?

you must be in a big co op...thanks for sharing your info man...



#48 Holistic Organics

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 12:10 AM

Big co op? 24 plants is only one grower/patient with 3 cards +their self. This grow is 24 plants. The co op has the potential to do 96, but nobody wants to max out just because we can. To remain legit we only take on truly sick patients that have been well interviewed and selected over time as truly in need. We dont normally even take donations for the people we care for. To our patients their needed meds are free as well as oils and medibles. We are in it to heal the sick, not get rich and bend the law. Only the best growers who truly care about what they are doing are going to be around after everything goes 100% legal. We intend to be those kind of people.

 

 

In Love and Light,

 

Holistic Healing



#49 PDX503Kush

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:38 PM

 

Interesting and involved readings H.O.! Maybe too involved.. Lol. Man.. We need to work out some sort of internship. LOL! Teach me your ways! Great work as always bro. Keep us updated. Thanks!

Too involved? Depends on your level of dedication/ passion I guess.  Cannabis is my passion. Its what I love, its what we need. The only passion I have with an equal flame outside of my family and growing food, is Fungi. IMO equally as amazing with potential to change the world as well. Internship? Nah, Im a student at the University of the Universe myself, just trying to share what Ive gathered along the way. Still a  long ways from a professor heck even a graduate.  Im still an embryo. :P

 

 

Yeah, that is what I meant... Too involved for me as of right now. lol. I am only a Newb, and I can barely keep my plants alive! lol. And about the internship, yeah I was just messin' with you bro. lol. Just keep up the awesome work and feed us your widespread knowledge please!

 

Take care n Jah bless mon. ;)



#50 Holistic Organics

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:22 AM

13 days of flowering

 

Day_20_flowering.jpg

 

 

day_20_flowering_no_harm.jpg

 

15 days

 

22_days_DOG.jpg

 

Day_22_flowering.jpg

 

18 days

 

day_25_flowering.jpg

 

day_25_going_to_sleep.jpg

 

 

 


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#51 Holistic Organics

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:30 AM

so the best place for organic amendments in all of PDX just dont buy their compost...

 

Hands down, best in town http://www.concentratesnw.com/

 

pdf of all the things they carry for your gardening needs!

 

http://www.gubbin.com/concentrates/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/retaill-list-130220.pdf

 

Here is the place for some good compost from time to time its not that great so ask to see a current analysis before you buy! This is the place that most other places who sell compost get their supply from, skip the middle man go straight to the source! Ive purchased yards of their best compost here for 6$ out of season, other places were asking 24-30$ for the same compost made here!!

http://www.naturesneeds.com/



#52 Holistic Organics

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:33 AM

day 22

 

29_days_flower.jpg

 

29_days_flower_trich_stackn.jpg


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#53 Holistic Organics

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:39 AM

29_days.jpg

 

101north_29_days_flowerpower.jpg



#54 SomeDude

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:51 AM

excellent posts and nice porn!



#55 Peaceman

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 03:28 AM

those are some of the best looking plants ever, they look really healthy!!!! nice work. Peaceman



#56 PDX503Kush

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:09 AM

so the best place for organic amendments in all of PDX just dont buy their compost...

Hands down, best in town http://www.concentratesnw.com/

pdf of all the things they carry for your gardening needs!

http://www.gubbin.com/concentrates/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/retaill-list-130220.pdf

Here is the place for some good compost from time to time its not that great so ask to see a current analysis before you buy! This is the place that most other places who sell compost get their supply from, skip the middle man go straight to the source! Ive purchased yards of their best compost here for 6$ out of season, other places were asking 24-30$ for the same compost made here!!
http://www.naturesneeds.com/


Yeah, I will definitely be shopping there for some organic amendments for this years outdoor season. Now I just have to compile a nice list of what I will be getting.. I've got some nasty clay soil that definitely needs amending. Lol. I wish I could afford an excavation and a nice dump truck of a rich loam soil. Lol.

#57 Holistic Organics

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:14 PM


Yeah, I will definitely be shopping there for some organic amendments for this years outdoor season. Now I just have to compile a nice list of what I will be getting.. I've got some nasty clay soil that definitely needs amending. Lol. I wish I could afford an excavation and a nice dump truck of a rich loam soil. Lol.

 

 

 

Well I wouldnt plant my cannabis in that soil. Amend it and do you veggies in that...For your meds build a soil base and ammend that, (do not use coco). You will be far better off in the long run. Dont worry about diggin holes you can just make a mound and plant right in that. Seen it done many times. Also a method called hugelkultur that is similar but a bit more in depth.  If you wanted to diy, you can rent a bobcat for about 70$ a day in some places. I would dig a long trench 2ft deep and as wide as you want or can afford to fill with your mix. A truckload of compost from natures needs is cheap at the right time of year. They will deliver for free if you buy enough yards of compost..



#58 Holistic Organics

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:15 PM

those are some of the best looking plants ever, they look really healthy!!!! nice work. Peaceman

Thanks :D :ph34r:



#59 Brownbear

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:58 AM

absolutely killing it man. I'm floored by how fast those plants have taken off. Testament to not only the genetics, but the methods in which they are being grown. Looking into getting a refractometer, should be pretty handy for the homebrew too! Keep it coming man, I'm loving this journal. What was your training method to achieve your canopy?


"As they fell from heaven, the plants said, "Whichever living soul we pervade, that man will suffer no harm.'
~ Rigveda ~

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#60 popeye!

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 01:12 AM

Damn dude that's absolutely incredible u got things down hands down definitely a good grower everything I see u do is dialed have honestly never seen a indoor grow room like yours but I'm truely impressed keep growing man u were meant to be a grower





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