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Fanatical Organic-al Botanical Methodology

cloning soil mixing recycling soil compost tea brewer building sourcing materials

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#21 xbrpete

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 06:01 AM

HO...

 

Where is your microbial source in the soil mix?



#22 Holistic Organics

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 07:27 AM

I always forget to list that. Probably because I dont add it to the soil mix, but I do add it in the very first soil drench along with kelp extract and a very small amount of molasses. I do this right when I pot the clones into the black gold and again when I transplant into the beds but  only in the rootzone. The first wetting of the beds is with areated compost tea, Im about to get to that...

 

Here is what I use..They dont list the cfus on the site but they are on the bottle.. Ill post em when I get more time.

 

http://fungi.com/product-detail/product/mycogrow-soluble-1-lb.html

 

Contains concentrated spore mass of the following:

Endomycorrhizal fungi

Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae, Glomus aggregatum, Glomus monosporum, Glomus clarum, Glomus deserticola, Gigaspora margarita, Gigaspora brasilianum, Gigaspora etunicatum

Ectomycorrhizal fungi

Rhizopogon villosullus, Rhizopogon luteolus, Rhizopogon amylopogon, Rhizopogon fulvigleba, Pisolithus tinctorius, Scleroderma cepa, Scleroderma citrinum

Trichoderma

Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma konigii

Beneficial Bacteria

Bacillus subtillus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus azotoformans, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus pumlis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus stearothermiphilis, Paenibacillus polymyxa, Paenibacillus durum, Paenibacillus florescence, Paenibacillus gordonae, Azotobacter polymyxa, Azotobacter chroococcum, Sacchromyces cervisiae, Streptomyces griseues, Streptomyces lydicus, Pseudomonas aureofaceans, Deinococcus erythromyxa


 



#23 Holistic Organics

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 06:11 PM

With the exhaust shut off for 12 hours no supplemental heat in the room, lights off, I checked the room to make sure everything was ok...

 

Temperature 81 degrees, CO2 PPM 2100

 

The large amount of soil really keeps it warm for a while, and obviously provides lots of CO2...

 

Been super busy, Ill try and get up to speed here.

 

Overall I think this setup is a win. Certainly will be doing this method for a while, with a few evolutionary tweaks here and there.



#24 eloquentsolution

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:00 PM

yea, looks like a real commitment.....

 

will be watching.



#25 Holistic Organics

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 01:50 AM

ouch, where is the auto save when you need it?



#26 Holistic Organics

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 02:08 AM

So before I can transplant anything into the soil mix, I like to get it wet with some compost tea to get the microbes working on breaking down those amendments and unlocking those nutrients. It would be ideal to give them a week or more head start in doing so. Two to three weeks being optimal but not necessary. Its not like a super soil where you have to wait a month for it too cool off, you just need to make sure its been good and wet when you plant to make sure there are no dry pockets and the available nutrients are able to be absorbed. Some brewing action, indoors no less  


It was pretty cold outside and its best to brew closest to where you will be using the tea so I did the easiest thing I could…

microbe_shower.jpg


ACT_indoors.jpg

Inside the brewer, two heaters an airlift and a pvc whateveragon bubbler. I gathered the info on building brewers from microbeman’s website :
http://microbeorganics.com/#So_You_Wanna_Build_A_Compost_Tea_Brewer

 

Inside_the_microbe_hot_tub.jpg

Ive used this set up in a number of different ways and locations, works great I would recommend it to anyone as a simple and cheap way to brew some quality compost teas.

The brewer getting warmed up for ingredients…



brew_the_do.jpg

brew_splatter.jpg


 


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#27 Holistic Organics

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 02:14 AM

Some of you are probably wondering whats in the tea.. I almost forgot, its microbemans recipe with my own adjustments:

 

http://microbeorganics.com/#Compost_Tea_Recipes

 

 

2 liters green waste compost
2 liters quality earth worm castings
4 cups molasses
2 cups kelp meal
2 cups alfalfa meal
1/2 cup powdered soft rock phosphate
1/2 cup Glacial rock dust
1/2 cup pure protein dry 15-1-1
60 ml quality fish Hydrolysate( not emulsion) I use Organic Gem
 

 

So how does it smell?

 

for the first 8 hours it smelled a bit fishy, by morning when I came back in it smelled like sweet earthy goodness. The molasses takes over after the microbes get to work eating the funk.. Im certainly going to be doing more indoor brewing :)



#28 Holistic Organics

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 07:33 AM

So after watering the awaiting transplants with ACT, and soaking the beds, the plants will be transplanted within 24 hours.
ready_to_transplant.jpg

 

 

Finding their places...

 

finding_a_place_to_seat.jpg
 

 

Transplanted first day in beds

 

Transplant_day_1.jpg

 

65 gallon pot gets 2 each

 

transplant_day_1_65gallon.jpg

^^^^^^^^^^^ white stuff on leaf, mykos Azos for you Pete! must have brushed up against it while I was filling the holes.. I had a bag that was going to go bad, I had to use it, LOL


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#29 Holistic Organics

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 07:47 AM

7 Days after transplant...

 

day_7_transplant.jpg
 


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#30 SomeDude

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 08:26 AM

I always forget to list that. Probably because I dont add it to the soil mix, but I do add it in the very first soil drench along with kelp extract and a very small amount of molasses. I do this right when I pot the clones into the black gold and again when I transplant into the beds but  only in the rootzone. The first wetting of the beds is with areated compost tea, Im about to get to that...

 

Here is what I use..They dont list the cfus on the site but they are on the bottle.. Ill post em when I get more time.

 

http://fungi.com/product-detail/product/mycogrow-soluble-1-lb.html

 

Contains concentrated spore mass of the following:

Endomycorrhizal fungi

Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae, Glomus aggregatum, Glomus monosporum, Glomus clarum, Glomus deserticola, Gigaspora margarita, Gigaspora brasilianum, Gigaspora etunicatum

Ectomycorrhizal fungi

Rhizopogon villosullus, Rhizopogon luteolus, Rhizopogon amylopogon, Rhizopogon fulvigleba, Pisolithus tinctorius, Scleroderma cepa, Scleroderma citrinum

Trichoderma

Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma konigii

Beneficial Bacteria

Bacillus subtillus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus azotoformans, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus pumlis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus stearothermiphilis, Paenibacillus polymyxa, Paenibacillus durum, Paenibacillus florescence, Paenibacillus gordonae, Azotobacter polymyxa, Azotobacter chroococcum, Sacchromyces cervisiae, Streptomyces griseues, Streptomyces lydicus, Pseudomonas aureofaceans, Deinococcus erythromyxa


 

 

 

79.95 a pound?????  are you serious???????????????????????????????????????


WWWWWWWWWWWOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW   can you say PROFITEERING?



#31 SomeDude

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 08:27 AM

ever tried raw honey instead of molasses?



#32 Holistic Organics

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 11:43 PM

Two tablespoons does 12 gallons so it lasts a while unless you are doing acres with it...

 

I will gladly accept a sample of your myco mix and do a side by side and publish the results. If I can find something better and cheaper I will go with that option any day.  How does your stuff compare price wise? Show me some whats in it and in what amounts if you dont mind... No I have never tried honey, as it is expensive and its naturally anti microbial and antifungal to such degree its used as a preservative. Not sure how my microbial herd would like that...



#33 Holistic Organics

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:34 PM

**Crickets chirping**



#34 Holistic Organics

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:13 AM

So after all that brewing you want to make sure your delivery is safe for your microbes to make it to their intended target may it be the rootzone or leaf surface. You may to want to take note of a few things that keep microbes alive on their journey from the brewer to the plant. Your pump if not the right type can be a death trap for a large portion of your hand fed microbial children. There are several types of pumps that will not harm the microbial life. Ill save myself some considerable time and carpal tunnel by sending you to where this idea originated for me.

Gardening Rythms Application Equipment

The site is informative although hard to navigate, if you dig youll find lots more good info. Read that then what Im making here and why may make more sense if you dont already grasp what Im talking about.

I use a diaphgram pump. This particular pump is on demand which means it builds line pressure then it stops until you call for it via pressing down the handle on your sprayer. Saves battery and needless cycling of tea through the pump, seen here:

 

Fimco High Flo Gold Series 2.1 G.P.M. starts at around 60$

compost_tea_pump.jpg

 

 

This pump doesnt need to be submerged and runs off a rechargeabe battery. I can run this pump for about 14 hours of holding the handle down. I recharge way before it runs out...

 

Here is the battery I use. price around 40$

Act_pump_battery.jpg

 

This battery was the only one they had at napa auto when I went to buy, not ideal but it works. Ideally you want one that is sealed and can withstand getting wet and laying on its side. This one has to remain up right, be refilled and be kept dry, so... I put it in a 5 gal bucket and drilled some hole to vent acid gasses generated by a hot battery. Two pieces of wood cut to wedge it in tight so it doesnt fall over. The clear tube is the acid overflow tube..

batt_housing_bucket_w_holes.jpg

 

Battery_protective_housing.jpg

 

pump_carry.jpg

 

I placed a doubled up contractor bag over the bucket opening and then put the lid on. This way if the pump springs a leak the battery below doesnt get wet. I mounted the pump on top of the lid and attached non collapsible hoses 30ft on the output side, so you dont have to move the pump much if at all in a small area

 Quick connects can be your friend, although I prefer the hoses to screw on at the wand handle as I have not been able to find a quick connect that doesnt leak at this joint. Mostly due to the turning and constant pressure put on the wand by my hand. No sharp turns in your applicating wand or the impact can kill the microbes. Ive examined several tea batches in different pumps and wands before and after pass through under the microscope these have shown the best results in saving microbes. Sometimes I take the wand off all together and just use it as it come out of the handle.

 

pump_mounted_wand_handle.jpg

 

best wand so far and easy to clean

 

best_wand_so_far.jpg

 

I take scoops of tea with a 5 gal bucket out of the brewer and dump them into the holding tank that my pump connects to. I turn off my brewer about 2 min before I take a scoop so not to get too much debris. then I pour it into the holding take through a window screen I framed to fit the barrel. Also placing the output of the holding tank several inches off the bottom prevents you from pulling any debris into the pump that would stop the pump.


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#35 Holistic Organics

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:19 AM

watering_container_mixing_vessel.jpg

 

Brew_nutirent_filtration.jpg

 

whole_system.jpg

 



#36 Holistic Organics

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:23 AM

so Day 17 the room is filling in nicely, so far so good :D

 

day_17_veg.jpg

 

day_17_veggin.jpg



#37 PDX503Kush

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 07:53 AM

Awesome looking setup bro! I bet it sure does beat the hell out of hand watering. Lol. I've found out the hard way that water is very heavy... I'll have to save some cash to invest in a nice irrigation system. I don't think my back can take anymore lugging around tons of water. Hehehe.
Anyways, the girls are looking very healthy and happy! Thanks for sharing bro!

#38 Holistic Organics

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:28 PM

To me its still pretty much hand watering. Im sure it would take longer using just gravity and a watering can though, lol. Until I get drippers and water timers I still feel its hand watering. The way I water to minimize the amount of overflow out of the bottom I take the advice of Tom Hill. His recipe works well for me:

 

Tom Hill

As a rule of thumb I calculate a water volume of around 10% of soil volume per "maintenance" (normal) watering. Occasionally I'll do a light watering (5%) or a more thorough soaking (15%) but 10% is the "normal" watering once we are in maintenance mode.

So that would be 1/2 gallon water for a 5 gallon container. These 6 foot containers are up around 50 cubic feet or something over 300 gallons. This requires about 30 gallons per cycle.

 

 

To calculate how many gpm Im getting I use a stop watch and a 5 gal bucket and time how long it takes to fill. As Im watering each pot I use the stopwatch and keep track of the time so I know how many gallons Ive put in. Also making sure Im spreading the water out evenly over the dirt surface and using paced even strokes until its covered evenly, then repeat until the timer goes off.



#39 Holistic Organics

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:48 PM

Here is one of my watering days.

 

Day 17 watering, 50 gal 

800 ml molasses,

65 ml Protekt,

350 ml kelp extract,

20 ml, Ej catalyst, 

therm x 70 1/4tsp per gallon

= ph 6.5 exactly

 

 

Foliar fed Calcium 25 a week earlier followed by root feeding the next day

 

molasses 1tbsp per gallon, therm x70 .25tsp per gallon
PureProteinDry 15-1-1   9 grams per gallon

 

Saw an amazing amount of growth by the next day. Literally 5-6 inches of new growth OVERNIGHT after those applications! I heard it was amazing stuff but never used it before. The Calcium 25 is a must have as is the PPD 15-1-1 amino acids WOW you need to try it.

 

Next time I apply it I will take before and after pics to document cause its impressive. Make sure your lights arent too high or they will stretch a bunch. Keep em low let em pack in.


 

 


 



#40 Holistic Organics

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:51 PM

here are the calcium 25 instructions... We use the vegetables and ornamentals Cal 25

 

[attachment=6477:Calcium 25 instructions.pdf]







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